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Mixed Kelvin Shoot - suggestions?


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#1 Nikolas Berndt

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:16 PM

Hi! 

I am shooting at a location with mixed temperatures: probably a corridor with two people by a big window blasting in light. 

So what would be the best setup for this? I am thinking a 1K lighting with a CTB for lighting the people, maybe with a 650 for fill. Or is it better if I bounce the daylight for fill and just CTB the 1K? It's just going to be a simple scene with them interacting with each other. 

 

Thanks. 

 


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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 07:09 PM

The right way of doing it will be based on how you want it to look. How do you want it to look?

Personally; when I'm in such situations, I find it pleases me to let the windows go a little blue and the fill light be a little warm-- depending on the colors of the room. If it's all white, i'd just let it go slightly cool. Generally I'd love to be able to bounce for the CUs; but that's not always possible in your wides. But again, it depends on how it's supposed to look, you know.


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#3 Nikolas Berndt

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:44 PM

The right way of doing it will be based on how you want it to look. How do you want it to look?

Personally; when I'm in such situations, I find it pleases me to let the windows go a little blue and the fill light be a little warm-- depending on the colors of the room. If it's all white, i'd just let it go slightly cool. Generally I'd love to be able to bounce for the CUs; but that's not always possible in your wides. But again, it depends on how it's supposed to look, you know.

Just pretty basic 3-point mid key lighting. Maybe also should have mentioned that I have to correct it, not have mixed kelvin in the actual shot - just have to shoot at a place with mixed kelvin. And yeah, will be needing a wide so bouncing will be a problem. So just a CTB for the, probably, 1K? Let the daylight act as rim light and fill with a 650? Or will using the sunlight as rim light be problematic? Should it be used as fill instead?


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#4 Giray Izcan

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:21 PM

Nikolas,
It depends on what film stock or ASA setting is on your camera, because putting ctb on 1k would reduce its power by 70 percent. So, your light levels may not be high enough for slower film stick or camera setting. Also, it depends on location size as well. If the location small where you will have your lights close to your subject, it may be sufficient. Worst case, you can set up your lights and take an inciden reading to see where your levels are. Adrian made a good point when he mentioned using mixed temps within a scene. For example, if you shoot on tungsten stock or setting, your tungsten lights would appear normal and daylight would be biased towards blue. It could create that warm inviting interiors as opposed to colder exterior. Or, you can put 85c filter on your camera with tungsten stock or setting to bring the temp level in between daylight and tungsten. This way, tungsten light would be even warmer and daylight would be biased towards blue in a lesser extent.
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#5 Giray Izcan

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:24 PM

Or you can gel the windows with full CTO to match with your tungsten stock. Or you can try to get hold of Kino flo bank(s) and put daylight tubes in for fill, ambient lighting etc.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:46 AM

I don't so much so mean "3 point lighting," i mean do you want it dark and mysterious, cool, or warm, inviting, or affronting. 3 point lighting can be many many things; but I think you first need to arrive at how the scene should feel and function, then you can go into how to go about achieving that given the location.

Else, what we advise here will be pretty broad and may not be what it is you want and or need for your picture.


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#7 Darrell Ayer

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

Have you considered letting that shot go into silhouette and then just use bounces for the close ups?


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#8 Darrell Ayer

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:19 PM

If bouncing is really important you could alway look for a large mirror or mylar? since those type of surfaces will throw the light farther.


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