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Day exterior conundrum


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#1 Graeme McMahon

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 09:03 AM

Hi,

 

Thanks all for taking a look.

 

About to undertake a test shoot for a feature.

 

With regards to lighting continuity on day exteriors, don't know whether to shoot oysters (maybe a bounce) for day exteriors to go through the scenes faster as opposed to pulling out gear and making the mids and CUs match. 

 

Factors involved in my decision, never worked with this producer and director before, so I think by being quick, they would appreciate it. On the other hand, a 10 year old kid is one of the actors, so it may take some time to get the performance, so a low sun might end up at its zenith by the end of shooting the scene. 2 to 3 pages.

 

We are going to be in the outback of Australia, so it is flat hot terrain.  

 

While I have you, besides the obvious shoot wides with the sun low and CU's as it gets higher, is it easier to fake low front or low back sun lighting in the scene (meaning after the wides, do we bounce into the shots with or against the sun next in your opinion)?

 

Thanks,


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#2 Denny Dey

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:20 AM

Although I am sure that you will gain more from additional input from others, here are a few optional suggestions:

 

If at all possible, visit each location prior to the shoot and study the location and angle of the sunlight as it moves over a period of time. This helps you visualize the problems you face when moving through the blocking and coverage and supplies you with information regarding your choices.

 

It's helpful to all if you determine, ahead of time, how the director plans to gain coverage.  It also helps to watch a rehearsal, if possible to "time" the movements of the actiors and gage the timing against the motion of the sun.

 

Finally, remember that high sun limits lighting options, and it's always a good idea to provide backup equipment designed to light your shots "out of trouble"...

 

Hope this helps...

Denny


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#3 Graeme McMahon

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:59 AM

Thanks Denny, that is all important stuff, but it's not really what I am after. I'm trying to gauge, do I keep it quick, or go all out.  And the second part, is it easier to fake low sun light frontally or back lit on a scene (being the one that is easier, I would do that last)?

 

Cheers


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#4 Darrell Ayer

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:17 PM

Gaeme,

I personally would do fast and easy with bounces.  You can shoot the C.U.'s first and use a gold bounce and perhaps a little underexposure so it has a last light look.  Especially with the kid, get his C.U.'s first while he has energy.  Go wide when the sun is setting so you get that shot and not kill yourself for pickups...

 

I always think a sunset looks great with silhouette on wides.


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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Rig Wheels Passport

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Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

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CineTape

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post