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Are pixel counts the new digital film stock?


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#1 Tony Muna

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 08:35 PM

There has been many discussions between film and digital formats.

But as technology improves and cameras become more affordable, will digital formats be chosen over pixel count?

Being a R1MX owner, I am noticing many gearing up for that 6K sensors and those just satisfied with 2K raw.

As technology improves will there be a point that pixel count would be considered a film stock?

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yes I am worried about my investment into the R1MX to practice and exercise but will we be looking at an industry that 4k would not be enough?
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:08 AM

Any and every camera system depreciates over time as the "newer and better" comes out. This is of no importance. What is of importance is whether or not you have a plan in place to pay off your investments. If you do, and you can, then good. If you don't, and you can't, you perhaps shouldn't've purchased in the first place.

It's all a question of what type of business you're courting and the requirements thereof.

All that said, of course, I have gotten plenty of mileage out of many of my digital systems over time. My EX1 paid for itself many times over in rentals/shoots where I added it on as a kit-fee. In the case of the RedOne, if you got it for a good price, then good. Get some shoots, pay off the body, and your next camera should interface with most of the (non proprietary) accessories, which is where the really good ROI is-- in those things every camera can use.

Also, I think you'll find a market for "4K" for awhile. At least until home TVs move beyond 1080p.


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#3 Vadim Bobkovsky

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:02 PM

There has been many discussions between film and digital formats.

But as technology improves and cameras become more affordable, will digital formats be chosen over pixel count?

Being a R1MX owner, I am noticing many gearing up for that 6K sensors and those just satisfied with 2K raw.

As technology improves will there be a point that pixel count would be considered a film stock?

***************
yes I am worried about my investment into the R1MX to practice and exercise but will we be looking at an industry that 4k would not be enough?

 

Some guys say the "true" resolution of proper 35mm neg is 8K... In a real world, often you'd want to scan a negative at 4K for 2K finish, a must for VFX work in post, really. In digital, especially with CMOS sensors, oversampled image is always better, with finer, grain-like noise structure. Sony F65 records 4K from 6K sensor and, judging from the raw footage, it looks fabulous as it is, if properly exposed and you can grade it to match a look of celluloid without that much sweat.


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#4 Brian Rose

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:33 PM

I dream of a world where digital camera makers would adopt the motion picture film paradigm.  Red is the closest in this regard, but I'd love a camera where I could swap out image censors as needed.  Where, a company could roll out a new image censor line like Kodak rolls out a new line of Vision stock.  Buy the new 800 ASA 4K chip!  Just swap in and out, do a software upgrade and you're ready to roll.  You could carry different chips for different shooting situations.  And you could charge a pretty penny for the chip, because as long as the camera was good, you could keep them buying new chips as you roll out better and better ones 


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#5 Chris Millar

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 05:22 AM

Cue Matthew...
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#6 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:30 AM

I dream of a world where digital camera makers would adopt the motion picture film paradigm. 

 

What would that mean?  Randomized photosites (position and scale) ?   Photosensitive elements that can map a  photon distribution rather than take an average value? 


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#7 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:23 PM

Cue Matthew...

LOL. Am I that predictable? I guess not since I waited so long to reply to this thread.

 

I have come to the realization that people can shoot on whatever they want and who am I to disagree? Doesnt mean I have to buy it though.

 

Just to show that I am openminded, I purchased a Sony a57 DSLR last week to see what it was all about. However, when I placed it on my HD502 head and set the pan super slow, I played the footage back in 1080p and noticed it still had the rolling shutter issue. It was then that I confirmed that DSLRs (at least that one) are totally useless for filmmaking. Suffice to say, it went back to the store the following day.


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#8 Chris Millar

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:09 PM

aw, come on - scratch that itch  :P

 

I know you want to !

 

Heck, even I want to 


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