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Shortfilm 1 Camera 1 Post (Grain) Question

Arri Alexa Red Epic Grain 16mm Aaton Anamorphic Post Grading

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#1 Mael Robijns

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:10 AM

Hi,

 

I have a couple of questions for our next (student) short we will be shooting in the first half of April.

At first we wanted to go 16mm (anamorphic), but it's quiet expensive for us. And wide angle anamorphic is a problem with 16mm. We're still thinking about it though. But it's probably going to be the digital way.

 

Now the short is about half and half daylight and nighttime. Probably a bit more at daylight.
We're thinking about renting a Red-epic since it's a lot cheaper (than an Alexa).
But I'm a bit "scared" for the nighttime shots with the epic. We will be passing neon street lights, in car shots which can get pretty dark, etc.

What do you think? Will it be ok?

 

Second question is about post production.

We love the (16mm) celluloid organic look, and specially for this film.

We were wondering how this is professionally emulated/achieved.
Are there a couple of ways?
I add professionally since we were thinking about festivals etc.
(I read somewhere that adding a random grainy look is okay for youtube videos but not for more serious stuff.)

Thanks ahead,
 


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#2 Darrell Ayer

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:10 PM

Check out the product FilmConvert.  It's designed to cater to almost exactly what you're asking about.

 

http://www.filmconvert.com/


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#3 Mael Robijns

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:37 PM

Well I was wondering what the best option was.
Isn't cinegrain better than film convert?


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#4 Darrell Ayer

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 10:32 AM

I haven't used either but (according to NoFilmSchool) FilmConvert adjusts the LUT of a raw file to match specific stocks in color rendition as well as adding grain in specific areas, such as highlights and shadows as opposed to a uniform grain added to the whole image.  The only thing that you find a detraction is that the grain is simulated on the image of FilmConvert as opposed to Cine Grain which is a recording of actual grain which you can overlay on your image.  I don't think either is better than the other,  as it depends on which is offering the look you are looking for.

 

Also This a real name forum , so please change your name to your actual name as per forum rules.

Good luck with your project and report back because I am interested in hearing about how well these products work.


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