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KODAK 5219 500T

exposing negative

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#1 zachary holloran

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:35 PM

Hey everyone,

 

I'm shooting a film on Kodak's 5219 500T, and want to obtain a denser negative, but am not sure how far I can overexpose.  I was thinking of exposing at 400, but wondered if it would be okay to go to 320...

 

I'm trying to achieve a lower contrast with minimal grain.  Any advice would be great - I couldn't find any discussions about this, which is why I started a new topic.

 

Thanks -

 

z

 


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#2 David Cunningham

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:46 PM

In MY opinion, you could easily over expose 500T by a full stop at 250.  In fact, if you don't have any extremely bright highlights, you might even be able to go two stops and expose as 125.  But, I'd probably stick with 250 and then adjust in post if needed.  Exposing at 400 you might not eve see a difference from 500.


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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:23 AM

+1 is no problem for 500T if you want a thicker negative.

 

-Rob-


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#4 zachary holloran

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:10 PM

Thanks guys - I really appreciate the help.  I wasn't sure if 125 would be too much, but I may run some tests and try it


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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:28 AM

Generally I always treat '19 as a 320T. I like the results it gives me. But, I would also not hesitate to rate it ate 250 after one or two "learning experiences" i have had time and again.


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#6 David Cunningham

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:57 AM

I almost always shoot my Super 8 500T at 250.  It helps to hide the grain a bit and bump up the shadows.  There's only minimal (if any) blown out bright highlight details and the primary subject almost always looks cleaner.


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#7 zachary holloran

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 01:18 PM

Would the same apply to the daylight stock 250?  Shoot at 125?  Or is it necessary to overexpose that stock by one full stop..


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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 01:22 PM

It depends on your testing, but personally I find not really. I may rate a 250D @ 200 or maybe 160, but I personally feel that in the 250 to lower speed ranges there isn't much need to overexpose.


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#9 zachary holloran

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 03:02 PM

Thanks a ton, Adrian - appreciate it man


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#10 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 03:18 PM

My pleasure. And don't worry to much; it's pretty hard to mess up an exposure on film enough that you need to sweat it ;)


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#11 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 11:50 PM

To be honest I have to slightly disagree with everyone. +1 on 5219 is incredibly modest and not going to give a significantly different look. If you truly want low contrast and fine grain then a good place to begin would be +2 pull 1 stop, even +3 pull 2 (this will be more dramatic). I recently shot a music video +2 pull 1 and was disappointed with how subtle the result was. You will be happy to see highlights still handle excellently and even when "blown out" do not feel clippy and digital. Most importantly make sure to get a good scan and colorist, you'll be fine.

 

Obviously film isn't fool proof, but... it doesn't hurt once and awhile to tell yourself when you're getting nervous about an exposure "its film, be brave!". You're shooting film for a reason, make the most of it.

 

Have fun!


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#12 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 11:55 PM

Would the same apply to the daylight stock 250?  Shoot at 125?  Or is it necessary to overexpose that stock by one full stop..

Are you over exposing to lower contrast or because you're scared of underexposing and thereby want a denser negative to "protect" yourself. If you're scared but don't want to build in a look, rate +1 and have no fear. If you actually want to build low contrast into your neg, overexpose more and pull the film. You could also look into savides' work on birth (and many others) where he uses underexposure and a slight pull to achieve low contrast and milky blacks.


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