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Requiem for a Dream: Extreme Close-Ups


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#1 Ben Brahem Ziryab

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:24 AM

Hi,

 

What kind of lens extension/tool would you want to use for extreme close-ups of eyes and objects?  

Requiem for a Dream does this very well, as you can see below. I am working with a set of Zeiss UltraPrimes and I am in the hunt for an affordable filter or tool that can get the lens focused at a very close distance for the same identical effect.

 

084.png?w=1000&h=

 


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#2 Ari Davidson

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 02:22 AM

Diopters should do the trick. 


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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 02:31 AM

Diopters or a macro lens. Something like the Zeiss 100mm Master Macro would be what i'd reach for.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:49 AM

I'd either do it with a 100mm macro or a zoom that went out to 250mm-ish and a diopter.  The 100mm macro would be sharper but to get that tight on the eyeball, the camera would be a foot away if not closer, so keep in mind that you need to light the eye in a way where the camera did not shadow the face (usually from the sides with a soft source like in the example above).  The source will be revealed as a reflection in the eye.

 

Don't be afraid to light this to a deep stop.


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#5 Rakesh Malik

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 01:58 PM

I've done still shots like that using extension tubes, is there any reason that this wouldn't work well in cinema? Extension tubes have the advantages of being inexpensive, zero adverse impact to image quality, and flexible since you can use them on all sorts of lenses.


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#6 Haris Mlivic

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 03:50 PM

I think the main disadvantage of extension tubes is the loss of light. You could loose something like 2 stops which could make it even more difficult to light if you are really close to the subject.


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#7 Rakesh Malik

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:46 PM

You lose light when you increase magnification, whether it's from getting closer to the subject or increasing focal length. Hence long lenses are either slower or bigger than shor lenses. :)


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#8 Vobla Unsane

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 07:05 AM

Cheap diopters soften things a bit, especially when paired with a vintage lens. I believe extension tubes are not brilliant either.

If you are after quality use macro lens, otherwise you are good with either alt option.


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#9 Freya Black

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 09:14 AM

Cheap diopters soften things a bit, especially when paired with a vintage lens. I believe extension tubes are not brilliant either.

If you are after quality use macro lens, otherwise you are good with either alt option.

 

Extension tubes contain no glass, they are just tubes, so they shouldn't cause any softening.

 

Freya


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#10 Vobla Unsane

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:59 AM

Extension tubes contain no glass, they are just tubes, so they shouldn't cause any softening.

 

Freya

 

true, there are no additional optical elements, but it essentially it causes your lens to focus closer than it was designed to, therefore any lens issues there may be are magnified! It's probably trivial while using good lenses.

 

Other nifty thing to try would be to reverse your lens on the camera. You can find cheap adapter rings for that reason. I believe this is a better method as you do not use extra glass nor you magnify lens issues. eg:

http://digital-photo...cro-photography

 

Or even add a reversed lens on top of another lens (something I haven't tried yet):

http://digital-photo...graphy-lesson-3

 

Cheers


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