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Editing Workflow


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#1 David Collins

David Collins

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 04:26 PM

Hi,

 

I was wondering if anyone had a "Workflow" chart for post production.  I've been moving into more and more advanced projects, and I want to start using a better workflow.

 

Previously, I just did everything in Premiere Pro, but now I've got people I work with who use Pro Tools for audio, and Davinci for Color Correction, and a few other programs in the mix.

 

I'm looking for a workflow or process map that shows the order everything should go through.

 

For example, if we are using Pro Tools to do the final mix, how would that interact with me use premiere for the editing?

 

Like, will he do each of the audio recordings individually, then send them to me to bring them in for editing?  Or do I do a rough cut, then send him that?  If I do that, how does the dialogue get synced up if we record independent audio?

 

 

I'm currently at DePaul getting a B.A. in Digital Cinema, with a focus on production and editing, but it seems that while all the classes explain the individual parts, none really go over the workflow of putting all the stuff together in in post (like, who does what at what time).

 

So, I guess I'm wondering what the industry workflow is, and what file types are best to go between programs.

 

 


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#2 Owen Parker

Owen Parker
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Posted 06 May 2013 - 07:25 AM

David,

Since you've been waiting a month and no one has replied I thought I'd give you my 10 cents...
I'm a freelance Editor and go from job to job with different teams and different set ups.
What follows is what I'd call a typical post workflow.

Point one, all workflows need to adapt to the project at hand.
That said, this is usually how it would go.

1) Rushes ingested into editing system for off line. This includes all the audio rushes.
Picture rushes are ingested at whatever resolution is appropriate. Low res if they are going to be conformed later for the online or full res if the edit set up can handle it.
Audio rushes go in at full res because there's no reason not to. Even the crappiest computer in the workflow should be able to handle professionaly recorded audio, if it can't it's probably steam powered and needs to be retired.

2) Rushes organised and Synced in the edit system. How that's done will depend on what system you are cutting on but all should be able to sync picture and sound from independant sources. (Double sys)

3) Off Line Edit. It's good practice to keep your audio tracked as follows - Top tracks - Dialogue, below them spot FX's, below them Atmos FX's, and at the bottom Music. That helps when you get to the Dub and also if you lose your Editor, who ever takes over can see where everything is.

4) When the edit is Picture locked multi track audio is exported to Pro Tools or whatever system is being used for the dub.
This can be achieved several ways, OMF, AAF etc depends on the machinery being used.
Picture sequence exported for online and grade, again depends on machinery.

5a) Audio Prep. Off Line seq is prepared for the dub. This usually involves a tracklay, adding more sound to what was used in the edit.
Laying out the audio in a fashion that make the dub easier. Depends on the dubbing mixer but will likely follow point 3 above.

5b) Picture Conform. Some if not all pictures will need to be conformed, replacing low res edit pix with Hi res pix.
At this stage you would usually prep the conformed full res pix for grading. Again this will depend on the machinery.
Some can handle clip based seq's directly from Avid, FCP etc others have to take a full res clip of parts (reels) or all of the edited film.
(Basically the grading system digitises the whole thing at full res.)
If the grading system takes the film in one big clip or a series of large clips the Picture Editor will supply an EDL of the picture locked seq.
This is then fed into the grading system in order to tell it where all the cut points are. The grading system can then break the long clip or clips into individual shots for grading.

6) Finishing and deliverables. Once the Dub and the Grade are complete the pictures will be out put and the dubbed sound track added to it ( layback)

Point 5 is split into a and b as they usually happenat the same time.

The above is what I would call Industry standard and works for everything from a low budget TV doc right up to the latest $100+ million movie. All that needs to happen are some tweaks based on project needs. CG, FX's, Music Composer's needs etc

Hope that helps

Owen
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