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Advice for shooting at wedding


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#1 James Bethel

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:24 AM

Hi,

 

I am going to be taking my Nizo Professional shooting for the first time on Saturday at my own wedding and have a few questions on metering for different stocks. I have V3 500T for the interior shots and V3 200T and 50D for outside shots (depending on the weather). The interior will be mostly lit by window light so I have an exterior 85a filter and light meter. So using 500T with a 85a filter should I meter for 320 or 250 or something else? Same question for the 200T and 50D.

 

Also any tips for light meter readings in a wedding scene (white dress / dark suit etc)? Should I aim to keep a consistent f-stop using ND filters or just take it as it comes? I will be getting a friend to do the actual shooting but will give them the exposure readings for each scene (the blind leading the blind!) so any tips will be greatly appreciated.

 

I am probably going to be taking it along for the honeymoon in Borneo so any tips on shooting in jungle / forest etc also welcomed

 

thanks

 

James


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#2 David Cunningham

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 11:52 AM

I would suggest going with 500T for the entire interior and do not use a filter.  You can correct for color in post.  With an 85 filter and 500T you will be looking at about a 320 rating which may be too slow.  Filming a window lighted large room is going to be challenging.  But, as long as you keep the windows behind the camera and in front of the subject, you should get a workable/correctable image.  Also, I'm sure you will have some tungsten balanced lighting in the room which will light your shadows.

 

You are not going to use the internal meter on this Nizo, correct?  If so, it's not capable of metering 500T or 250D.  You would get a good reading for 200T (at 160) and 50D (at 40).  But, 500T would over expose (at 160) by somewhere around 1.5 stops.  That would probably be fine in most conditions but I fear that the window light may cause some extremes in bright and shadow highlights so over exposing at that rate may result in excessive blown out highlight details, especially in white wedding dresses, wedding cakes, white linens, etc.

 

I wouldn't bother with the 200T outside because with an 85 filter it will become about a 130-140 speed film and not gain you much unless you are dealing with dawn or dusk, in which case the low sun angle will result in a yellowish light that would be conducive to running with no filter and getting the full 200 speed.  So, in short, unless you are dealing with dawn or dusk, go with 50D unless it's VERY dark in which case it's probably raining and you won't be outdoors anyhow.  :)


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#3 Mitchell Perkins

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 02:29 PM

Wide open at all times indoors, unless the windows are huge and it's like daylight in there.

And yes keep your [shooter's] back to the light....[!!!!!!]

 

Outdoors, f11 in the sun, 5.6 in the shade [or shaded faces].....wide open if it's dark outside.

 

This is rough but hey it's the negs and you can focus on the bride!

Congratulations!

 

Mitch


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#4 James Bethel

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:06 PM

Thanks for the tips. I took some readings from the site with an iPhone light meter for what it's worth, but gives an idea of what I am dealing with:

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#5 David Cunningham

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:50 PM

Interesting test.

 

Your very last test is a great example of what you are up against.  Notice in your last frame that you blow out the highlights i the white sheet.  However, your film is going to have way more latitude than your iPhone.  So, that same setting would be perfect for 500 speed film.

 

Based on this I would not have it full open using 500T indoors.  I'd aim more for the 4 to 2.8 range, closer to 4.  I'm not experienced with the Nizo Professional optics, but I would guess your depth of field and sharpness are going to be much worse off at full open 1.8.  But, I would definitely shoot the 500T without a filter and adjust for color in post.


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#6 Matt Stevens

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 09:28 AM

Interesting test.

 

Your very last test is a great example of what you are up against.  Notice in your last frame that you blow out the highlights i the white sheet.  However, your film is going to have way more latitude than your iPhone.  So, that same setting would be perfect for 500 speed film.

 

Based on this I would not have it full open using 500T indoors.  I'd aim more for the 4 to 2.8 range, closer to 4.  I'm not experienced with the Nizo Professional optics, but I would guess your depth of field and sharpness are going to be much worse off at full open 1.8.  But, I would definitely shoot the 500T without a filter and adjust for color in post.

 

I'm thinking he could get away with 200T here. In fact, were he to purchase 250D from Pro8mm he would have a beautiful image. But Pro8 are crooks so he'd have to deal with the knowledge that they could hold his film hostage with outrageous shipping charges. 

 

Were it me I would shoot 200T. But I have the experience to do so. 


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#7 David Cunningham

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 10:04 AM

Not to get back into the whole Pro8mm argument again, but I've never had a problem with getting them to use USPS flat rate boxes.  However, I have had the problem of a few of their carts being a few feet short of 50.

 

I think he could get away with 200T, but I'm not sure what the advantage would be other than being able to go back and forth between outdoors with an 85 filter and indoors without, which you could still do with 500.  I just think with that lighting and 200T you will end up opening the aperture all the way and now you have to deal with super shallow depth of field and probably not quite as sharp an image.  At least by stopping it down to 4 or so you'll have some increase in depth of field and sharpness.  Depth of field can become really important when you're moving quickly to capture live action moments that you can't repeat or ask them to wait.

 

I guess you're going to have that problem even at f4, but I think it will be at least a bit better if you don't get the focus spot on.

 

250D would be ideal so he wouldn't have to correct in post, but, like you said, then he's stuck dealing with Pro8mm for film and processing.  Not necessarily a bad thing as I've had some good success with them.  But, like you indicate, they can be hit or mis and sometimes challenging.  


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#8 David Cunningham

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 10:12 AM

Quick calculation shows the depth of field thing probably doesn't matter much even at full zoom to 80mm.

 

Assume the subject is 10 ft away, at f2 and 80mm your depth is 2".  Increasing to f4 only gets you up to 6".

 

If you're fully zoomed out to 7mm at f2 your subject at 10 ft away has about 8' 4" of depth.  Stopping down to f4 actually gives you infinite depth on that subject.  So, I guess it depends on the look you are going for.


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#9 David Cunningham

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 10:16 AM

One last thing on the Pro8mm discussion...

 

If you have a business account with Kodak you can get 500T Super 8 carts for about $16, or, at least I can.  Add about $15 for processing at most good labs and your only at $31.  So, you are paying $4 more per roll than you could probably work out elsewhere.


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#10 Matt Stevens

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 09:28 AM

200T will have noticeably less grain vs 500T. Of course, I love grain so I love shooting with 500T. :)


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#11 Mitchell Perkins

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 12:27 PM

There's no depth of field to speak of in Super8 anyway, so I wouldn't worry about stopping down to get some. I've shot dozens of weddings on the S8 negs professionally. Based on your pics of the indoor location you'd better crank that thing wide open, 500T or 200T, or you will be disappointed.

 

For weddings I used a Nikon Superzoom8 with part of the panel cut away to allow for finger-drag on the main gear - with camera set at 12fps and dragged down to about 6fps or so, I got usable faces indoors with 500T. 18fps would have left the faces dark.

 

Since it's a wedding and not a narrative piece, you want faces! faces! faces! and everything else be damned.

 

Let the dress and the windows and the table cloth blow out, but if you have dark eye sockets it will look bad.

 

Mitch


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