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Shooting with kodak 500T Low light

kodak 500T

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#1 Alejandro Gonzalez

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 07:59 PM


Hey guys, I shot this using vision3 500T in my 35mm SLR camera. It was a rehearsal for a scene. Im not the DP for this project btw. But just wanted to practice my skills. All I had was the TTL metering of my camera (reflective  metering). 

 

I was having trouble getting a fast enough shutter speed due to the lack of light. the 500T can shoot at EI 1600, matter fact this shot was probably just that. Unfortunately the slow shutter speed and wide apertures I was forced to use led to a whole bunch of blurry unusable shots.

 

How does this relate or differ from using an actual motion picture camera? I would imagine that hand held shots in movies are only achievable in well lit scenes???

 

BTW below is a better shot because I had more light coming in from the windows.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91909492@N06/8690001967/" title="rehearsal by frametheory, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7043/8690001967_140bc808b7_z.jpg" width="640" height="360" alt="rehearsal"></a>

Edited by Alejandro Gonzalez, 28 April 2013 - 08:04 PM.

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#2 Alejandro Gonzalez

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:05 PM

Ok guys, having a tough time uploading images to this site. Ive tried everything. Hope you get an idea of my question by the description alone.


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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 10:11 PM

On a film camera you don't change your shutter speed, you're generally at or near 1/48th of a second for 24fps shooting. and 500T is more than enough for that in most situations. However, we are often shooting with T1.3 lenses. How slow is your lens?

Also, in motion; there is less of a problem with blurring of the image, as in truth all the images on film blur. It's part of the "film look," that specific motion blur you get @ 24fps with a 180 degree shutter. But in motion you don't notice it nearly as much as you do in a still.


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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 10:15 PM

8690001967_140bc808b7_z.jpg

 

 

 

 

Also if that is the shot you are referring to, I don't see much of an issue. Looks like a film frame to me.

I got it by right clicking the photo on flickr and copying the "target location," and then in the full reply I just clicked on insert image and pasted it.


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#5 Alejandro Gonzalez

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:05 AM

8691120778_063b595724_z.jpg

 

Got it. Thanks man. This is actually the frame that came out blurry. But not as blurry as all the other ones. I was afraid to open up my aperture to f1.8 as I wanted more depth of field and sharpness. Guess i should have. Its better than having hand held camera shake.


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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:10 AM

Aye; when you're on (motion) film, you really adjust aperture much more so than shutter speed.

For that image, it looks ok; but you'd've benefited if lighting it perhaps by back lighting those two with something and then using a white card to bound some back for fill. The guy looks good, on his head and all; but I'd've hit them with a rim, and then used a white card to bring it back into their faces.


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#7 Alejandro Gonzalez

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:02 PM

Just saw your reel, great stuff man. yeah i agree. and plus the backlight would have helped me with the exposure. the day of the shoot when they have everything setup i will see if i can sneak some shots in without bothering folks. im the story artist for this project.

 

By white card do you mean white reflector as used in photography?


Edited by Alejandro Gonzalez, 29 April 2013 - 08:03 PM.

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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:14 PM

Thanks Alejandro; I'm glad you liked the reel.

You could certainly use a white-reflector from stills photography. Normally I use stuff called Foam Core which you can pick up at any arts shop. There's also Show-Card which is 1 side white, 1 side black, great to have around.


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