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#1 SolomonM

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 02:26 AM

Hey guys,

I could use your help. I'm about to embark on a rather interesting shoot. It's going to be a 30 minute long continuous steadicam take. Shooting on a 35mm @ t/4 on the Alexa. I could use some advice in regards to the set-up and what technique you think would work best. I'm familiar with pulling remotely on steadicam rigs, but this is a first for me when it comes to the length of the take combined with the complexity of the moves. The op will be going back and forth between crane, dolly, and roaming. I would love to get your opinion on which gear to go with for the following

1) Wireless follow focus (leaning towards preston)
2) Wireless transmitter/receiver (would appreciate a money no object, and then a "reasonable" option)
3) Possibly a monitor (see below).

I'd also love to get some input from you guys in regards to technique.

1) Typically, in the past, I've always followed and pulled along side/behind the steadicam op but that may be difficult this shoot. Would you advise trying to stick with him or go the route of pulling wirelessly from a monitor?
2) Is there a way to rig a smaller 5-7" monitor to the preston with a cinetape readout and a wireless video feed etc. so I could somewhat follow with the steadicam op? Would that be a better route to go than sitting next to a 17" field monitor?
3) Also, I'll be using cinetape for the first time in my career. Do you guys have any suggestions or is there anything I should prepare myself for? I'm still not entirely 100% sure about the mechanics insofar as how it functions and knows what the camera is looking at. I know it's there simply to be a spot check and I shouldn't rely on it.
4) Do you think that 1-2 anton bauers could actually power the camera, WFF, cinetape, and all the other gak for a 30 minute take?

Any other tips for pulling on extremely long takes would be much appreciated. Thank you in advance guys! I really value the advice I've gotten on here in the past!
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#2 David Desio

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:50 AM

30 minute long take?

 

Im not sure the batts will last that long for continuous shooting.  Maybe....Test it first.

As for puling, without knowing the route I don't know which would be best.  I'd do a combo of monitor and marks/watching the OP.  You are not wide open so have a little room for error.  Is the OP going to be doing rehearsed moves?  Playing JAZZ?

 

I work with an OP who plays more Jazz than anything and I mostly stick to the monitor, glancing at him now and then as well for distance guesses.  Puling from the monitor is tough though, you are more reacting than being active to his moves.

 

Does the OP have a wireless system?  He should. 

 

I like to pul with a digital Preston, but a digital Bartec is also good.  Analog Bartec...in a pinch.


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#3 James Malamatinas

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:52 AM

Hi Solomon, I can't answer all of you're question but I thought I'd recommend Saul Oliveira's guide for it which you can find here http://www.saulolive...orking-material. It might help you pick up a few tips on using it before you get on set.

 

Hope it helps and good luck with the shoot. 


 


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#4 Gregor Grieshaber

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:59 AM

Hi Solomon,

 

I can recommend you the Teradek Bolt as a wireless video. You can use it with more than one reciever. That means you can put one on your belt or wherever and the other one goes to video village. Another advantage is that it has no delay. Maybe it is a good thing for this shot. A cheaper alternative would be the Paralinx Arrow. It has the same zero delay and multicast features but it has only HDMI connectors. That means you need a SDI to HDMI converter for the transmitter.

As a monitor a TV Logic VFM 056 W would be nice. You can use it with a Battery Bracket and small camcorder batteries. Make sure contrast is at 100% and backlight at 50 then you have a very good focus reference. It also has a HDMI in if you go with the Arrow. Just make sure you have a good sunshade. It has not enough punch for bright daylight.

As far as I know there should be a way to mount a Noga Arm to a Preston. But be aware that your hand may not be used to hold something that heavy for such a long time. Your hands could get tired or sore pretty quick. Maybe there is still time to train a bit?

But to be honest with that lens and t-stop I wouldn´t look to much on the monitor unless the action is coming really close. You may get better results by looking live at the action and judging distance maybe in conjunction with the Cinetape.

Did you guys consider to bring in a second steadicam operator as a backup? I don´t know how many 30min takes a well trained steadicam operator can do in a row.

I wish you lots of fun and a successful shoot

 

Gregor


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CineTape

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Rig Wheels Passport

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

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