Jump to content


Photo

Camera Sliders


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 George Odell

George Odell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Gaffer

Posted 06 May 2013 - 03:15 PM

Is there a size/length of camera slider that seems to see the most use?

 

I'd like to add one to my grip kit. Just wondering if one size gets asked for more than others.


  • 0

#2 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 06 May 2013 - 03:47 PM

I find most commercially made are was too big, the one I use the most is about 30 inches long.


  • 0

#3 George Odell

George Odell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Gaffer

Posted 07 May 2013 - 12:52 PM

So less than 3'?

 

I would have thought DP's would want something longer to allow for cutting in after the start of the move and out before it ends.


  • 0

#4 David Desio

David Desio
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 204 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • california, USA

Posted 07 May 2013 - 01:03 PM

I like to use a 4 to 6 foot slider, you are right George, it allows us to cut after the move and also cover a little more ground making the move IMO worthwhile.


  • 1

#5 George Odell

George Odell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Gaffer

Posted 07 May 2013 - 01:12 PM

Anyone used this CamTram system? Comes as a kit and you use your own (or borrowed) alumninum extension ladder as the track? 


  • 0

#6 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3076 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 08 May 2013 - 08:07 AM

If I'm using an actual slider, then I prefer the 4ft version. More often though, I use my Dana Dolly system with either 5ft or 10ft steel tubes.


  • 1

#7 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 08 May 2013 - 04:09 PM

So less than 3'?

 

I would have thought DP's would want something longer to allow for cutting in after the start of the move and out before it end

 

 

 

The larger the slider, the more space you need, so by being smaller & faster to set up it gets used more.

30 inches is about the most you can easily move the camera without physically moving. I will use a dolly if I want a big move.


  • 0

#8 Tim Tyler

Tim Tyler

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1291 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Olympia, WA (US)

Posted 08 May 2013 - 09:23 PM

A slider like the Dana Dolly allows you to choose different pipe if you need to work in a small space or need a long run.


  • 2

#9 Matthew Kane

Matthew Kane
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts
  • Electrician
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota

Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:19 PM

I'm a huge fan of the cam-tram system. You can also build custom track out of unistrut. While I haven't used the higher end accessories, there are motors and such that you can use to expand it into a really useful kit. With the gear and the time, it can really do a lot of cool stuff.

 

I find Dana Dollies are a bit faster to set up, and you can tuck them away in the truck. A key grip I know built one for very cheap, and rolls it around on the speed rail or on dolly track that's opened halfway. Used it to roll down the narrow aisle of an older jetliner the other day. It may not be able to do as much stuff as the cam tram, but it's a little more straightforward and flexible in a limited range of deployments.

 

If you want a tripod mounted slider for small cameras, I'd build one off of McMaster Carr hardware--most of the retail options seem to be a big ripoff to me.


  • 0

#10 Dino Giammattei

Dino Giammattei
  • Sustaining Members
  • 63 posts
  • Other
  • A mile west of the crossroads and the old circus grounds

Posted 06 July 2013 - 06:52 AM

We have a five foot Kessler with motor and an Oracle controller at work. Having the motor really makes all the difference when using the full travel of the platform. I never could get consistent speed using the little crank. Before we got the motor, I would just manhandle the camera with my freakishly long orangoutang arms. (5'11" with a 6'3"wingspan). I have also come up with a way to mo-dino-fy (as I like to call it) the rig with a counter weight attached by cable to the platform for use in vertical and diagonal moves with great success. It takes the stress off the belts so they won't slip or be damaged. There goes the warrantee I guess. I understand that some sliders now come with this feature.


  • 0

#11 Bradley Smith

Bradley Smith

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Other
  • Virginia

Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:35 PM

I use a short (30") Konova for slider shots.  I like it because it is short enough to mount on a single tripod with a smaller camera, and also small enough to throw over my shoulder.  As long as you have an object in the near field (critical for slider shots) you will get the effect you want.  Also narrow DOF shots look great on a slider if you can get enough light on your subject to really open up the aperture.


  • 0

#12 dan green

dan green

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • canada

Posted 06 March 2014 - 01:05 AM

Yes you are right, short sliders are going good now days, easy to carry and to put on shoulder. I am also using a slider. I bought this purely on the recommendation of my friend, and I was not disappointed at all. Quality is great and the slide is very smooth. I was incredibly pleased when I took it out of the box because of the construction of the slider and the awesome carrying case it came in.

 

http://www.flycamdslr.com/hdvs/CAMTREE-3ft-Linear-Camera-Slider-C-S3-4010-with-Level-Feet.html


  • 0

#13 Laura Beth Love

Laura Beth Love
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 20 January 2015 - 06:54 AM

I'm a big fan of the Cineped 3.5' slider.  The quad-pod base is a bit "clumsy" to adjust if you are moving fast, but it's all quite rugged.  Otherwise, the dana dolly, in 6' length, is my go-to.  With all slider systems, keeping them well maintained is key.  Even on the lowest budget shows, I often have to rent my slider separately from a g&e package because of their upkeep.  Rails that are chipped, dirty wheels, tiny misalignments... they can all ruin a shot.  The fewer moving parts the better... or else your team must intimately know the gear to keep it running smoothly. :) 


  • 0

#14 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3510 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 10 February 2015 - 04:40 PM

I hate the Cineped, but that mostly has to do with the legs as Laura says. They are a horrible design and very slow to setup and move. I have a Kessler 3' Cineslider which is ok but not great for anything bigger than a C100. MYT Works makes a pretty decent one that is much lighter than the standard Mitchell based sliders. Of the large size, I've used the Original Slider and the Silent Cat, both of which can be temperamental if not kept immaculately clean. I find the simple Dana Dolly works the best for me.


  • 0

#15 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 719 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 11 February 2015 - 09:29 AM

I have liked the Matthews Floatcam.  Also called the HD-DC Slider.  It has a counter weight along the track that slides opposite the camera.  So it can also be used as a jib arm.  


  • 0

#16 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3510 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 February 2015 - 06:57 PM

Good call Michael. The older DC Slider works really well, will have to check out the HD version.
  • 0

#17 Sanjay Sami

Sanjay Sami
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Grip
  • Anywhere they pay me to go

Posted 19 February 2015 - 03:09 AM

The Ronford-Baker sliders are really good. Very rugged and require minimum maintenance . They are available in different sizes and will take anything from Canon 5D to IMAX cameras. Highly recommended.

 

http://www.ronfordba...oducts/sliders/


  • 0

#18 Mark Kenfield

Mark Kenfield
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1053 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia/Wherever The Wind Takes Me

Posted 22 February 2015 - 11:43 PM

I use the Cinevate Atlas 200. Which is a beefy bastard that runs on chromed steel rod. The advantage of that is you can change the length of the slider by simply having longer or shorter lengths of rail (a really useful feature).

 

I keep the slider mounted to 4' of rail so that it fits nicely in a Pelican 1750 for easy transportation. But I also keep a set of 8' rails for shots that require a more substantial movement (or more commonly these days, for use as a quickly set up overhead rig for the camera or jib). 

 

The Cinevate runs on sealed ball bearings, so the movement is exceptionally smooth, but that comes at the cost of some noise during faster moves. It's a trade-off I don't mind making for the versatility that the slider offers - but it is still a tradeoff.


  • 0

#19 Sanjay Sami

Sanjay Sami
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Grip
  • Anywhere they pay me to go

Posted 24 February 2015 - 07:15 AM

The Cinevate sliders look good, but don't look like they can be mounted on a dolly. 

Also, there does not appear to be a Mitchell mount or 150mm bowl option. Its only 100mm bowl.


  • 0

#20 Sanjay Sami

Sanjay Sami
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Grip
  • Anywhere they pay me to go

Posted 24 February 2015 - 07:23 AM

I was looking at the wrong product. They have Mitchell mounts for the Atlas 200.


  • 0


Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

CineLab

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS