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Tungsten or daylight for shooting bronze casting?


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#1 Juha Mattila

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 05:51 AM

Hello,

 

Im trying to find right film for indoors shoot of bronze casting process. Im going to use tungsten lights so you would thin that tungsten is right option but Im concerned that it will change the color of melted bronze. So would tungsten to daylight gels front of the lamps and daylight film be better option? I think Im going to use 200/250 speed film because I think 400 cant handle the brightness of melted bronze. Im shooting 16mm. I would be grateful for any comments.

 

Kind regards,

Juha Mattila


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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:24 AM

Depends what you want it to look like.

 

 

If you shoot it daylight, the orange glow of heat will be more orange compared to the surroundings, which sounds like a good idea to me - but it's a choice.

 

Perhaps shoot some tests on stills film if you can.

 

P


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#3 Freya Black

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 08:32 AM

Not sure I quite understand. If you are shooting with tungsten light then you would use tungsten film in order to get the scene to look normal. If you gel the lights more blue and then shoot on daylight film to correct for that you are going to loose a lot of light from the gel which may make things harder to light.

 

I think it would look nicer with the 200T and tungsten lights but I'm not sure quite what you are trying to achieve and it might depend in both instances how colour accurate your lights are.

 

Freya


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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:33 AM

The issue is that there'll be a lot of glowing hot things around, which may look (marginally) more orange compared to daylight than tungsten, which might (or might not) be desirable.

 

But I echo Freya's concern about the huge stop loss from blue filters. If you want to shoot daylight, get daylight-emitting lights, such as HMI or appropriate fluorescent.

 

I'm not too sure it'll make a huge difference either way.


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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:38 AM

Tungsten stock. If you go daylight It'll probably go way too orange of a glow, I'd think. If anything, you can always make it look orange-er later on when you color correct but you don't want to be dealing with having to change out all the lighting in the place to tungsten-ish (incandescent around and all of that). The speed difference is marginal between the two; but if you're rolling up with tungsten lighting you'll want to establish a neutral first (for everything else) and then the glow will fall where it belongs-- e.g. as it looks to your eyes for the most part.


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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 05:11 PM

check out this film shot by Rob Houllahan on Tungsten stock

 


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#7 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:37 PM

check out this film shot by Rob Houllahan on Tungsten stock

 

 

Was that really molten iron?  Will moltern bronze give off a different color?

 

The conrents of the crucible (bronze) will probably look white hot with some warm glow.  Shooting mixed source coudl look good.  Tungsten film,  localized tungsten light,  unfiltered window light,  the white heat and warm glow of the crucible and furnace.

 

Worth googling footage on bronze casting.  You may get a feeling for the relative colors.  Best of all shoot a few feet showing the various options,  or the most likely option.


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#8 Juha Mattila

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 10:51 AM

Thank you all for helpful answers!

 

I think Im going for tungsten stock. I cant make tests in actual foundry but I might try shoot heated iron under tungsten light to give some reference... Thanks again!


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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 12:13 PM

Will moltern bronze give off a different color

 

Strictly speaking, yes, as they're only nearly ideal blackbody radiators*. The temperature of the metal will make more difference.

 

P

 

* the emission lines of different elements vary (sodium is famous for being bright orange, with a tiny bit of green, for instance), but that won't make much difference in practice. It'll get overwhelmed by the blackbody radiation.


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