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How to Repair Damaged Track


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#1 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 02:34 PM

Hello,

 

Looking for ideas on how to repair damaged aluminum precision track (ie, FilmAir). Not talking about the cross-braces, buckles, etc. -- talking about the actual rails. Small nicks/scratches can be ok, but anyone have any methods/ideas on how to get rid of, fill in, or smooth out larger gouges or dents in the anodized coating? Looking for local (NYC-based) or personal solutions, not sending back to manufacturer.

 

Thanks.

 


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#2 Edward Lawrence Conley III

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 12:06 PM

You can try some JB weld and then just sand t down using finer and finer grit sand paper until you get to wet sanding and you should end up with a pretty smooth surface.


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#3 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:05 AM

Sounds like a good time to buy your own and get into the rental game  :)


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#4 Onno Perdijk

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 03:57 PM

Hi Daniel,

 

Most damages are cosmetic. All others will ruin your shot...

 

You might have the soft dents which can be resolved by using thin tape, placed diagonal over the surface. The dolly will run on and of the tape very politely.

 

The sharp dents with some waste sticking out of the tube can be best cut away with a sharp knife, Using sandingpaper will not suit you very well.

 

A more permanent way is sanding around the dents until the alumium is visible, use a fluid alumium-component to fill it with (productlink available on request) and slightly flatten it using a spare blade or a knive.

 

Hope this works,

 

if not, buy new :-(

 

Good luck,

 

Onno Perdijk

 

KeyGrip / Manufacturer

Amsterdam

www.solidgripsystems.eu


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#5 Jason Fratis

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 04:41 PM

I have filmair track and have made covers for it using pvc.  They snap on and off quickly.  Only a couple nicks over several years.  As far as fixing I like the jb method mentioned.  If you put your wheels on the track you can see the exact contact line.  Very little of the track's surface is actually used to make contact with the wheels.  I'd fix only the area where the wheels ride on.  Even then if its a nick all you really need to do is make sure there is no aluminum protruding outwards.


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#6 JD Hartman

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 12:35 PM

I second th suggestion to remove high spots with a sharp blade and blend in the result,  Deep nicks are best filled permanently via TIG welding and smoothed out afterward  Easier to prevent damage due to rough handling with a snap off cover as suggested then fix it after.


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#7 George Ebersole

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 12:19 AM

Like the other guy said, JB weld, or maybe Bondo.


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#8 Mark Cruxifield

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 04:17 PM

they were damaged because you probably did not have covers for your track ? I found a website http://www.littlegre...ssory/pvc.shtml

 that is very similar to speed clamp that i use to cover my track when going out and works real well, it was a good investment,....  Mark at http://tccranes.com/


Edited by Mark Cruxifield, 15 August 2013 - 04:20 PM.

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#9 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 07:44 PM

."...anyone have any methods/ideas on how to get rid of, fill in, or smooth out larger gouges or dents in the anodized coating? ..."

If you have dents or scratches that need to be filled,  an issue to be cautious with is the bond to the aluminium.  It oxidises so quick.. You can scratch it with fine sandpaper or scotchbrite to get a key and clean it with solvent then apply the filler (glue mix) quickly.  Sometimes to get a bond to aluminum I have abraded the surface wet,  with epoxy as the wet medium.  No oxide is possible.  A bit neanderthal,  but it works.

Once a suitably hard and tough filler has been added to a low spot or gouge (epoxy resin with glue filler?),  the problem then is how to dress that back to shape without adding a large area of scratches with the sand paper around the actual repair.  Familiarity and skill can make that easy.  Otherwise,  there are some tricks.  For straight surfaces,  developed surfaces,  as in any surface that you can create or simmulate with a curved piece of cardboard.  Sanding blocks with the paper stuck to the block.  Double sided tapes on aluminium box section is good.  Wood blocks are ok, I suppose  (nah).  If you are not familiar or are out of practice,  wrap some masking tape around the ends of the block,  and you will then only be abrading the high spot. 

Use glued sanding blocks to shape stuff in a controlled way,  then softer blocks with some cushioning  with finer paper to smooth and blend stuff.

 

A marine laminating epoxy like West with some glue filler might be ok.  Sorry George,  bondo is crap for this sort of thing,  unless one is unfamiliar with the sand papering,  in which case the softness (relative to the aluminum)  will help keep one out of trouble.


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#10 Paul Bodi

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 03:16 PM

If I remember correctly Bondo was the suggested repair method by the makers of Precision I-beam track which is also anodized aluminum.  


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