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Camcorder VS DSLR for youtube

dslr camcorder youtube

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#1 Sarah Nagel

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 01:00 AM

Hi there,

 

I would really appreciate some advice!

 

I have a youtube channel, and I currently shoot my videos with a Canon VIXIA HF R200. It does the job, however I definitely need an upgrade. The battery life sucks, the exposure is crazy and always needs to be adjusted, and the colouring is sometimes weird.

 

I have been trying to figure out what camera other youtubers use, and notice a lot of them use Canon DSLR's such as the T3i.

 

I am wondering if I would be better off getting a camcorder, or a DSLR? 

 

I am open to all brands, however I was looking at the VIVIXA HF G30 for camcorders, or maybe a canon t4i or canon 60D?

 

I want something that's easy to use, I would like it to have autofocus, and I want a nice bright image quality, I like to have glowing skin in my videos and have everything bright and happy looking. 

 

I like the idea of the ease of a camcorder, however I feel I might have more creative control with a DSLR + it would double as a camera :) 

 

my price range is up to $2000

 

my youtube channel is www.youtube.com/holistichabits if you would like to see the video quality right now and make a judgment call on what needs to be fixed.

 

Any advice would help. Any suggestions??

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to read and/or reply :)

 

-Sarah

 

 


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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 08:12 AM

To get really good results, there will always be a need to adjust exposure and colour settings. Buying a different camera isn't going to change that, no matter what you get. Beyond that, if you want to make people look radiant and healthy, well, that's one of the biggest concerns that any cameraperson has, so you're definitely going to have to get used to a bit of manual intervention to get the results you want.

 

The good news is that it isn't particularly difficult. The DSLRs make pretty pictures, although there are issues over depth of field which may make it harder to keep things in focus. This is less of an issue with current models than it ever has been before, so you should probably probably find a friend who owns one, or rent one for a day or two, and see what you think. What may particularly interest you is that a DSLR, properly set up, can do something to get you away from the rather harsh, electronic look that consumer-level video cameras have historically suffered from.

 

There's absolutely acres of DSLR advice on this and other fora, but in your shoes I'd probably be looking at a T3i or something of that sort. Budget for a better lens than the kit one, it's pretty poor.

 

P


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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 09:27 AM

I wonder if perhaps too something like the Sony VG series might be useful; like a VG20. It I haven't played with them myself, but it's always been an interesting mix of vDSLR and Camcorder look.


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#4 Zac Fettig

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:34 AM

Also keep in mind what you're shooting. If it's interview kind of stuff (or talking to the camera, like in your videos), DSLRs generally have serious overheating problems. They shut down after ~10 minutes of video (at least mine does). I have a Canon 60D (1080P DSLR) and a Canon XL2 (Standard Def miniDV), and I'll always reach for the XL2 first for interview stuff. It's designed to shoot video. Battery life is good enough; the DSLR isn't any better (actually, it's worse). Long takes don't cause problems like they do with a DSLR. Autofocus is a lot easier with a camcorder. I love the 60D as a still camera. And occasionally will shoot video with it (like on vacation) with Magic Lantern installed. But it isn't as easy to use or setup.

 

If it was me, I'd wait for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera to hit the streets (next month) and get real world reviews (a few weeks later) or stick with the camera you've got. The BMPCC will autofocus with MFT lenses, designed to shoot video, and wide dynamic range. It can use almost any lens ever made with adapters and manual focus. It won't shoot stills. The camera you've got is yours and free at this point.

 

Honestly, it really sounds like what you really need is a good lighting kit. It looks like you're using open windows for lighting, which is good, but uncontrollable and inconsistent. Get something that'll kick out a decent amount of light, in a controlled color temperature. It doesn't need to be expensive. Considering the tight quarters you're filming in, clip lights would work fine. For video, diffusion is really important.


Edited by Zac Fettig, 10 June 2013 - 11:35 AM.

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