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Lucas and Spielberg

The implosion.

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#1 Richard Boddington

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 12:15 PM

Fascinating article:

 

http://www.hollywood...ion-film-567604

 

I've been saying for years these gambles on the massive budget tent pole movies is out of control.  Only a "free market" correction will reign in the spending.

 

Interesting what Spielberg said about Lincoln almost being a HBO movie.

 

R,

 


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#2 Keith Walters

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:55 PM

Fascinating article:

 

http://www.hollywood...ion-film-567604

 

I've been saying for years these gambles on the massive budget tent pole movies is out of control.  Only a "free market" correction will reign in the spending.

 

Interesting what Spielberg said about Lincoln almost being a HBO movie.

 

R,

 

Bah! Movies about Tent Poles have had their 15 seconds of fame anyway.
Does anybody ever make movies about tent pegs, guy ropes, or, tear-my-tongue-out-if-you-must: TENTS THEMSELVES?!!
Oh no, of course not.
OK society is uncomfortable with canvas-related subjects. I get that.
But surely the purpose of film makers is to push the envelope.
So what if the envelope gets wrinkled and dirty, and the glue gets dust in it and won't stick any more.
It's inside what counts. the denomionations, the traceability, and most inportant THE NUMBERs!!
All Mr Boddington seems to be able to produce are movies about dogs.
Ok he doesn't have the budget for even a CGI Tent Pole.
How about a film about a camping stretcher, or even just a sleeping bag if you're a complete PC wuss?
We've gotta wake up and smell the linoleum sometime folks, why not now?

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#3 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 10:34 PM

Fascinating article:

 

http://www.hollywood...ion-film-567604

 

I've been saying for years these gambles on the massive budget tent pole movies is out of control.  Only a "free market" correction will reign in the spending.

 

Interesting what Spielberg said about Lincoln almost being a HBO movie.

 

R,

 

So was "American Graffiti" (1973), well a Movie of the Week. There's always stories like that but rarely are they un-embellished. The axles of Hollywood are greased with bullsh!t. IF Hollywood studios are on the decline, it ain't this year! They just had the most profitable May in motion picture history. There is a place for studios, STUDIOS are the only ones that can scrape together 200 mil to get a movie made and some of those movies are incredible. There is also a place for those personal stories shot on a digital still camera or even cell phones. Though for my tastes, not necessarily my favorite genre, but even so, there are several I LOVE! I really would count the studios out any time soon.


Edited by James Steven Beverly, 13 June 2013 - 10:37 PM.

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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 03:07 AM

David Puttnum makes some comments on the issue: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/22883015


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#5 George Ebersole

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 03:16 AM

<p>Well, movies aren't interactive. &nbsp;They're essentially visual books. &nbsp;Good books stick around on bookstore shelves for years and see reprints. &nbsp;At one time they were the &quot;movies&quot; of the pre-movie era. &nbsp;Movies are now the new books or oil paintings in terms of popular mainstream entertainment.</p>
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#6 Richard Boddington

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 12:04 AM

 I really would count the studios out any time soon.

 

I wouldn't either, there seems to be an endless supply of hedge fund managers that will give them money.

 

R,


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#7 George Ebersole

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 08:45 AM

There's always going to be an appetite for films.  I think the majors are realizing that losing market share to interactive entertainment doesn't mean they'll disappear, but it does mean they may want to reconsider how they do business.  

 

Hopefully they can go back to cranking out PG films for adults,  Regular movies instead of niche artsy BS or blockbuster SFX junk.


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#8 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 10:20 PM

George,  what movies were you thinking of there as niche artsy BS?


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#9 George Ebersole

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 05:07 AM

George,  what movies were you thinking of there as niche artsy BS?

I actually say that tongue in cheek, but when I cruise for DVDs most of the films I see fall into three categories; Sundwance award winners, CGI for families/kids and the mainstream Blockbusters like Thor or GI Joe.

 

When I was growing up things like Star Wars were the exception the rule.  Now SFX-action films are mainstream.  Only movies that follow the Star Wars model have, essentially, outdone Star Wars in terms of far out settings, SFX shots and action.    You don't see regular stuff like, oh hell, I don't know, "The Goodbye Girl" with Richard Dryfus.  or "9 to 5" with L:illy Tomlin, Dolly Parton, Dabney Coleman and Jane Fonda.

 

I can't remember the last time I saw a mystery in the theatre, or an old fashioned romance that didn't pack a lot of juvenile dialog in it.  

 

Some mainstream BS films I saw last year were "One for the Money", "Our Idiot Brother", "What's your Number" and a half dozen others. It's like if a movie doesn't have half its humor devoted to explicit sex jokes, then it isn't a movie.

 

Hollywood has tried so hard to reach for that pre-teen to 20-something dem that they totally forgot that their empire was built on an audience that cut across all ages.

 

And now they're feeling the effects of that business model.


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#10 Richard Boddington

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 11:52 AM

 they totally forgot that their empire was built on an audience that cut across all ages.

 

I sure hope you're right!  :rolleyes:

 

R,


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#11 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 03:15 PM

 

I wouldn't either, there seems to be an endless supply of hedge fund managers that will give them money.

 

R,

 

You and I need to meet those guys!!


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#12 George Ebersole

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 05:33 PM

 

I sure hope you're right!  :rolleyes:

 

R,

Heh, well, who knows?  I hate to sound like a goddamn history film geek here, because I know some of you paid attention in that class,  but think about what kinds of films drew audiences between the 30s and 60s.  Look at how films changed in the 70s.  Look at what resulted in the 80s.  And then look at what we've got in the 90s and 2000s.

 

When I entered the industry I had high hopes of being a director producer from my humble beginings as a grip, PA and Stage Manager.  That'll never happen now.  BFD.  But even though I'm out of the loop, I do have some thoughts, and one of them is that  I do Hollywood's paranoia about family or PG rated films has finally blown a hole in their head.  Those are films I would have liked to have helped shoot, but no one makes them anymore. Now it's all witty dialog, sex jokes, action with with witty dialog, and a whole lot of sexual tension.

 

Just my take.

 

p.s. I also think it would have helped them had they gone back to making films without social agendas; like Will Smith in a movie version of "Wild Wild West", or perpetually hammering home how military themes in movies are a bad thing by showing hyper sexualized violence.  Hundreds of examples.


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#13 Richard Boddington

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 08:15 PM

 Hollywood's paranoia about family or PG rated films has finally blown a hole in their head.  Those are films I would have liked to have helped shoot, but no one makes them anymore. 

 

 

I'm making them! I'm making them!!  Live action family films, the genre that time forgot.

 

Besides it's been proven that families increase concession sales when a family film is in the theatres.  Not sure why the big chains in the US don't demand more? Especially since this is a revenue stream they don't share with the studios.

 

R,


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#14 George Ebersole

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 08:48 PM

 

I'm making them! I'm making them!!  Live action family films, the genre that time forgot.

 

Besides it's been proven that families increase concession sales when a family film is in the theatres.  Not sure why the big chains in the US don't demand more? Especially since this is a revenue stream they don't share with the studios.

 

R,

You got me, Richard.  But when I say family film, I don't mean a kids' film that parents go to.  I mean a film for adults that they can take their kids to.  No one makes those anymore.

 

I haven't seen one made in, hell, what, 20 years?  I can't remember the last true PG (not PG-13) or G rated film that wasn't a children's film.  They used to make those.  They used to be big draws at the box office.


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#15 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 10:33 PM

The recent Muppets movie was made for both adults and kids (kids were never going to get all the jokes about the 1980's in the movie.) I'm sure there are a few more examples like that.

Look at some of the films listed here:
http://www.ondvdrele...-family-movies/

"Hugo" sticks out from the list as a film that wasn't made just for kids.
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#16 Richard Boddington

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 12:46 AM

The Odd Life Of Timothy Green?  Waaaaa, like that kid will ever work again, I mean.....oh wait, never mind  :)

 

R,


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#17 Richard Boddington

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 12:47 AM

Well David, now that you've seen, Against The Wild, how do you think it will do appealing to both kids and adults?

 

R,


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#18 Keith Walters

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 02:51 AM

You got me, Richard.  But when I say family film, I don't mean a kids' film that parents go to.  I mean a film for adults that they can take their kids to.  No one makes those anymore.

 

I haven't seen one made in, hell, what, 20 years?  I can't remember the last true PG (not PG-13) or G rated film that wasn't a children's film.  They used to make those.  They used to be big draws at the box office.

Well, whatever you might  think of the latest Marvel franchise films (Iron Man, The Avengers etc) you've got to admit that as soon as Stan Lee and his old buddies managed to  wrest back control of the rights, and started making direct motion picture equivalents of the comics they pioneered nearly 60 years ago, they turned out some damned impressive money-printing machines.

OK not exactly kiddies movies, but they amply showed that a movie with no (0) profane language, explicit violence, sex  or gratuitous nudity, can be still be enjoyed by people over 18. And they weren't even particularly expensive films to make. 

On the other hand, I had trouble staying awake through the latest Spider-Man reboot, which Stan & co have not been able to regain control of.

 

 

Here's the sad reality: There are PLENTY of people who could make the sort of movies you're talking about, but they're just not interested in participating in the sad, cynical, incestuous, substance-riddled, arse-licking, casting-couch-driven culture that currently controls film making.


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#19 George Ebersole

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 07:43 AM

The recent Muppets movie was made for both adults and kids (kids were never going to get all the jokes about the 1980's in the movie.) I'm sure there are a few more examples like that.

Look at some of the films listed here:
http://www.ondvdrele...-family-movies/

"Hugo" sticks out from the list as a film that wasn't made just for kids.

Thanks Dave

 

I saw a couple of those, and they were good films.  But they were specifically family films, which I think is a good thing.  I guess I mispoke and should have said something like a film for adults that was either rated G or PG.  There used to be tons of those when I was growing up.

 

Keith; well, you got me there.  I love a good film, whatever it is, but a guy gets tired of watching hero-X save the universe for the umpteenth time.


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#20 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 10:34 AM

Well David, now that you've seen, Against The Wild, how do you think it will do appealing to both kids and adults?

 

R,

I think it qualifies as family entertainment, something for everyone to sit down and watch together.


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