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Big Movie Question?


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#1 Kristian Fino

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:32 PM

Hi,

 

     My name is Kristian, I am a huge fan of Horror and Action films. One of my favorite Film directors are Italian directors name Dario Argento, Lucio Fulci, Mario Bava, Francis Ford Coppola, and Sergio Leone. My favorite action filmmakers are John Woo, and Robert Rodrigues. I watch a lot of Italian horror/Giallo movies, those are my favorite when I first watched a lot of Dario's stuff and Fulci's stuff too. I want to make horror films a lot like how Argento and Fulci does theres, just their style of colors and camera angles is what I'm obsessed about. Its their craft. My way of telling the story of plot would be a lot similar to Stephen King's material. I'm a #1 fan of his before Dario Argento. I've read a couple of his books and seen a lot of movies adapted to his books, and that's when I said to myself, that's the way I want to make my movies like. The way of the story and characters of Stephen King and Camera and color art and craft of Dario Argento. I've actually done my own Independent film for a school project. Its a horror film called "It Came From the Woods", the story was written from a friend of mine and I did all the editing and camera angle work on this film. It's on Youtube right now I tried to make my own vision a lot like Argento's material, but after watching it, I began to think I did it too incorrectly. Im not trying to plagiarize Dario's work, the last I check my other favorite director John Carpenter can do his films almost a lot like Argento can, so that's when I thought I should do the same if someone can make movies like that person can.  The kids loved film that me and a friend of mine did. My question is how can I create like these two artist (Stephen King and Dario Argento) combined into my own art of films?

 


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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 05:55 PM

You're asking a very general question. Can you link us to an actual example of something you like? Then we can discuss the sort of techniques you could apply to get similar results.

 

P


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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:06 PM

It's a bit apples and oranges isn't it? You aren't comparing two different visual artists, you are comparing a writer to a director and asking how to synthesize the two.  Otherwise you just have to apply the director's visual approach to the stories created by the writer... so I'm not sure what the question is.


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#4 Kristian Fino

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:37 PM

I know, I'm sorry I got you a little confused David Mullen. I have a disability (Asperger Syndrome) and its hard for me to explain my question in a way for you to understand. Here's what I'm trying to say. What I like about Stephen King is the way how he writes his story so well plotted out by making his characters more human, meaning he writes honest dialogue to his characters and not trying to write some potty mouthed humor in ways we can relate to but just not the right kind of humor like the way stuff his today. Plus I know how he gets his ideas. Also he screenwrites so he can put in the right story plot for whenever someone is adapting a book of his. That's why I want to write screenplays. Sorry I didn't mention that in my question. The reason I like about Dario Argento is the way his camera angles are and how the cinematography of his films look. Everytime I watch his stuff it just really amazes me how every angle and color of his films are so, so perfect. I've watched an interview of his and he did mention about ("Subjectiveness is important in my movies, the camera becomes the eye of the person, it walks, moves, approaches things from the person's point of view. I sometimes use a new camera called a steady cam. I identify greatly what is happening on the set. For me, the lens becomes like the spectator's eye. I want the spectator sucked into the scene. I want him to approach objects, or people. In the end, it is you the spectator, who kills, or who is murdered.") it really seem so helpfully interesting on how he explains the way how his movies are so visually scary in a way that is more open to the world than just always cut every part of a killing scene. Has no restraints on showing you the killing scenes so explicitly it is amazing. So did this explanation help at all? I need to know. I won't be offended or anything, just need an honest opinion. Thanks.   


Edited by Kristian Fino, 14 June 2013 - 09:41 PM.

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#5 Kristian Fino

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 10:49 PM

You're asking a very general question. Can you link us to an actual example of something you like? Then we can discuss the sort of techniques you could apply to get similar results.
 
P

Well here's a clip that I've watched from Youtube called Dario Argento's dreamscapes is what I think is called, this should show you what i'm talking about. Which is my kind of visual style of his, every angle, every camera movement, and every color grading of his I admire.         .


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