Jump to content


Photo

Lighting Interior for Music Video Help!


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Luke Sommer

Luke Sommer

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 17 June 2013 - 04:27 PM

Hey everyone, just discovered this forum and thought you all may be able to help me with my lighting.

 

I'm shooting a music video for a 3 piece rock band in a house and they sent me a video of the kind of vibe they wanted with the lighting: (I only care about the lighting in the main performance, living room part)

 

I'm a noob with lighting, but it looks as if they are pumping a ton of light through the windows (tungsten, with the camera daylight white balanced, given how orange it is) and have a bit of haze in the room, plus some fill or bounce cards, to bring up the band.

 

I'm wondering what kind of lights they used?  It looks sort of like Maxi-brutes or maybe large tungstens (5 or 10ks).  What kind of generator would be needed to power such lights.

 

Sorry for all of the beginner questions, but I'm normally just a director, but will be handling lighting for this project, as well.  Also, it's very low budget, maybe $4-500 for rental.

 

Thanks for all the help!

 

 


  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 17 June 2013 - 04:44 PM

For $4/500 you probably won't be able to afford to rent the genny you'd need for big lighting units... on top of the lights and the proper distro and someone qualified to run it.. plus the gas; a 5K, for example pulls 50 paper amps, remember, Watts=Volts*Amps. So in this case, you know the Watts, 5000, and the volts, 100 (rounding here to make it easier and give you some head room to deal with line loss ect), so you need to figure out the amps... 5000=100*x? well 5000/100=50 so 5000W=100v*50a. I know the math is basic, but this is important to understand when you start shopping around for gennies. So to even begin to light this with tungsten you'll need a genny where you can come out on 100A legs and then split that off through a distro system. I am assuming you haven't used a genny like this before, and as such I HIGHLY advise you don't do it, or you hire someone who knows what they are doing. Electricity Kills, and a distro system from a genny is most certainly not plug and play.

 

Now, onto how to do this on the cheaper. Depending where the house is located, it would probably be simplest to gel the windows with full CTO, which will give you the orange, balance to daylight on the camera, and bounce light in with shiny boards. Then you just have to blow out the windows, which shouldn't be too substantially difficult on a digital camera.

The room is smoked/hazed, yes, and for the interior lighting I would rent some kinos and maybe a few small HMIs to match color temperature outside and provide you with fill

You'll want to shoot all the performance stuff quickly as the sun moves, but it's not that fast-- just have someone to reposition the shiny boards as you go.

 

If you want shafts of light, look into HMI PARs, 1.2Ks should be good. Now on HMI they don't pull as many amps as their wattage suggests. A 1.2K HMI will pull more than 12amps for example. I don't know the amperage off hand, but it is listed on the ballast. If you are powering from the location; you'll want to lay out the circuits.

Get a boom-box, plug it in in a room in 1 outlet Turn off breakers while music is playing, when you hear the music stop, that breaker is powering that outlet. Label it. Now go back upstairs to that room and plug it into each outlet in the room until it either 1) turns back on, or 2) you're out of outlets. Label the outlets as to what breaker they go to. Repeat for all rooms/outlets in the house. The home-owner will probably thank you for labeling their breaker box.

Household power is normally 15A or 20A service per room, depending. So you can't power much from each outlet, you'll still need to run distro, but so long as you're below 20A of power you can use 12/3 cord--- also known as extension cords. 14/3 can get you buy up to about 15A. The cord size should be listed on the cord.

 

Also remember, HMIs and Kinos don't normally dim. There are some which do dim, but the dimming will be done on the ballast of the unit. Do not run it through a dimmer-board or hand-dimmer.

 

If you want to go all tungsten, you'll loose a lot of efficiency first correcting the tungsten to blue (2 stop loss) and then back to orange (2/3 stop loss).


  • 1

#3 Luke Sommer

Luke Sommer

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 17 June 2013 - 09:18 PM

Hi Adrian!  Thanks for the detailed response.  I sent you an email with an offer, you may be interested in.  Either way, thanks for all of the info, really appreciate it!


  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:49 AM

My pleasure Luke. I shot you an e mail back.


  • 0


Opal

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly