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16mm Day for Night Interior


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#1 Keil Mitchell

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 12:42 PM

Hello everybody. My name is Keil Mitchell and I'm beginning to start a new project using Kodak's 16mm B&W Tri-X Reversal film. I will require an Interior night scene and since I don't have the means to set up lights outside the second story window I will need to shoot it as a day for night. I want the scene to look as though the key is coming from street lights and moonlight from outside so I figure using a red filter in the camera may cut down too much light and limit my options. I'm thinking about gelling the windows with either nd gels or red gels and using an Altman soft box and kino flo's as fill. Does anybody have advice or recommendations?

Thank you for your time.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 01:21 PM

You don't need to use a red filter inside... Red filters are only used for day-for-night to darken the blue in skies, with underexposure, the blue sky can then go near black. So unless you have big windows that look out at blue skies, I don't see the red filter helping much.

Your main challenge is making the exterior view look dark enough when inside. If the whole scene is supposed to be moonlit, it's a bit easier in that you essentially are lighting for a sunlit interior look just underexposed to make the sun feel like the moon. But you may need HMI's to balance interior and exterior light levels.

If the scene has practical lamps on, then you really have to find a way to darken the windows, ideally with heavy ND acrylics cut to cover the windows.

I don't see how you can make a day interior feel like a street lamp is lighting it, without a dark background outside the window. Underexposed sunlight isn't going to look like a street lamp.

If you have a location that you can't light, first find a new location.
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#3 Keil Mitchell

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 01:46 PM

Thanks for your reply. The windows won't really be in the shot too much, maybe a part of them will be for a second. I just want to use them as a lighting source. I mean, I might not have the gel the windows but perhaps just underexpose correctly but I've been slow at learning the gray scale.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 01:49 PM

ND windows down a lot so it's "dim outside," and then light with motivated sources inside. Streetlight won't really work. You can make it look like "moonlight" but only if you can get a reference to "normal" brightness on the inside, e.g. from a table top lamp overpowering the light outside.

 

You could also get kind of creative, and, let's say you have a big window in the BG of one shot, not super noticeable, but maybe put a matte painting in it showing the moon? Depends on how stylized you want to go; but if you had a nice full moon out of focus in the BG then you could, in theory, key from that same side and have it look like it's the moonlight coming in. Again augmented by eventually having lights in the room overpower the moon-light as would happen in "reality."

 

just a thought.


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#5 Keil Mitchell

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 10:57 PM

Thanks for your replies. They have been very helpful. The scene is a couple walking into an unlit house at night so my goal is to match that look by having the moonlight from outside as the key. The way the rooms are setup I feel like the viewer will barely see the windows. Perhaps for a second or less. I'll be doing meter testing on Friday to figure out if I really need to buy nd filters at all or just underexpose and match the fill accordingly.
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