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Tri-X - half a stop overexposure


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#1 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:01 AM

Just asking for peoples opinions on how acceptable overexposure looks on Tri-X. Obviously, this is very subjective. Ive never shot Tri-X on super before though I have used Tri-X on 16mm and with that format, I exposed it correctly. Although Tri-X is rated at 200asa for daylight, the cartridge will 'instruct' the super 8 camera to expose it as 160asa which is about half a stop of overexposure. For those that do shoot Tri-X on a semi-regular basis, does this amount of overexposure look okay? I'm guessing that the exposure latitude of this stock must be a little generous.

 

Out of curiosity, has anyone had Tri-X 'pulled' by half a stop during developing? If so, what are the results like? With pull-processing however, there is a reduction in contrast which is no good thing for black and white film.

 


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#2 Richard Hadfield

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:20 AM

I think 200 asa is just 1/3 of a stop higher than 160 asa, not 1/2 of a stop. 

 

These are the  steps or 1/3 stop increments between 160asa and 320asa.

 

160asa 1/3 stop to 200asa 2/3 stop to 250asa 3/3 or 1 stop to 320asa


Edited by Richard Hadfield, 28 June 2013 - 02:23 AM.

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#3 Jamie Frazer Noakes

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 03:46 AM

I have shot loads of Tri-X in super 8 cameras rated at 160asa and the 1/3rd of a stop overexposure is negligible. You will only encounter issues in bright sunlight, but then Tri-X is the wrong stock for that situation anyway - unless you want that effect.

 

I have only had Tri-X "pushed" (more exposure) by half a stop - but this was only on old stock - it does indeed flatten the contrast - but if you are transferring to digital this can be a good thing as a slightly flatter contrast can yield better results when scanned to video - since many telecine lenses add contrast to your already contrasty reversal film images.

 

I just got a roll of 7 year old Tri-X back yesterday - I exposed it as 160asa - wide open at f1,4 and shot at 9fps (for effect) - I had this film pushed by half a stop and it looks great (for what I want anyway).

 

It is always best to shoot a test roll before you shoot any important work.


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#4 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 03:54 AM

I think 200 asa is just 1/3 of a stop higher than 160 asa, not 1/2 of a stop. 

 

 

Yea that just shows how bad my maths is. I was recently at an event shooting a mix of Ektachrome 100D and Tri-X. Switching between film stocks, I thought I recall there was about half a stop difference in the light readings - when taking a reading from the same subject (unless my memory is playing tricks on me. ) Camera used was a Canon 1014E.


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#5 Jamie Frazer Noakes

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:43 AM

 

Yea that just shows how bad my maths is. I was recently at an event shooting a mix of Ektachrome 100D and Tri-X. Switching between film stocks, I thought I recall there was about half a stop difference in the light readings - when taking a reading from the same subject (unless my memory is playing tricks on me. ) Camera used was a Canon 1014E.

 

Hi Patrick, was my answer of no use?


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#6 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:15 AM

 

Switching between film stocks, I thought I recall there was about half a stop difference in the light readings

 

The difference between E100D and TriX@160ASA is 2/3 stops. Hence your "about half a stop difference" makes sense.


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