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How to use automatic metering on Super 8 Camera?


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#1 Carl Conrad

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 12:00 PM

I just got a couple of Super 8 camera's from a local goodwill and I wanted to get into filming with real film instead!

 

I got a VTG Kodak XL 362 (which has an automatic eye) and I bought a brand new roll of Kodak Tri-X Reversal Film 7266 I was wondering how to get the automatic eye to read the correct ISO of the film so the film won't be either overexposed or underexposed? (there are no settings on the camera to change ISO).

 

Thanks alot! 

 

 


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#2 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 03:31 PM

Hi!

The super8-cartridge is "notched". The size and amount of notches informs the camera about the type of film and its ASA.

More info:
http://www.peaceman....ew-and-improved
And
http://super8wiki.com/


Jörg
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#3 Carl Conrad

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 10:28 PM

Thanks! I did not know this about the Super 8 cartridges. Thanks! 


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#4 Carl Conrad

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 12:40 AM

Sorry I am new to this:) and trying to learn fast!

So, the original manual to the camera says that Tri-X Reversal Film 7278 works with all light sources.
I have a brand new roll of Kodak Tri-X 7266.(same ISO) Is this the almost the same? Will it meter properly?

Thanks!!
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#5 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:19 AM

When the camera's manual says that it can expose the old Tri-X correctly, then the camera should also be able to expose the current Tri-X correctly. (As the only difference between the two Tri-Xs is the reduced grain in the newer version.)

However there might be one problem when shooting outdoors: Using the Tri-X in an XL-camera on a sunny day would require the camera to close its iris to much more than f/16 (e.g. f/22, f/32 or even f/45). Hence many of the XL-cameras can close their iris to f/32 or f/45. However there are some cameras that can't and where f/16 or f/22 is the limit. And I don't know whether your Kodak-camera belongs to the first category or to the second.


Edited by Joerg Polzfusz, 03 July 2013 - 03:22 AM.

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