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Telephoto lens support


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#1 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 09:29 PM

Any idea where can i find or make a support for this lens .. so its less shaky

 

thanks

 

 

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#2 Christopher Sheneman

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:35 AM

I'd say get closer to whatever you're filming and get a new shorter lens- AM I RIGHT GUYS?!

 

What are you filming? The Nazi's across the English Channel- lolhahaha!

 

But seriously, dude- what's with the lens? Are you trying to compensate for something?


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#3 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 02:06 AM

Any idea where can i find or make a support for this lens .. so its less shaky

 
I'd be more concerned about deforming the camera mount or lens. How heavy is that thing?
 
Traditionally you'd use rods, a lens support that slides on the rods and if the lens doesn't have some sort of support anchor, a lens bracket. The lens support should be at the right height to carry the weight of the lens without putting any pressure on the camera mount ie the mount locking ring should lock and unlock without binding.
 
Bolex made a lens support accessory (see http://www.bolexcoll...s/filter60.html) but you don't see them often.

Edited by Dom Jaeger, 04 July 2013 - 02:09 AM.

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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 02:16 AM

Any idea where can i find or make a support for this lens .. so its less shaky

 

The problem with the Bolex is that it doesn't really take the standard lightweight support bars, I don't know if you've got access to a machine shop, but it might be worth checking with Les Bosher if he's made a support system for the Bolex. http://www.lesbosher.co.uk/

 

Allthough from memory the 3 lens turret version has a screw in the body behind the lower lens opening that could be used for a support bar.

 

You may find that the tripod in your photo isn't great for long telephoto lens work. The current arrangement is front heavy, so you may wish to have a tripod mount fitted into the lens mounting system, so that the rig balances. You might manage a one off using metal in a simple  L type arrangement, a local machine shop should be able to do a one off, although if you've got the tools and the metal skills a DIY is possible

 

I assume you're using this for wildlife photography, stills camera telephoto lenses are extremely effective for this work.


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#5 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:17 AM

I'd say get closer to whatever you're filming and get a new shorter lens- AM I RIGHT GUYS?!

 

What are you filming? The Nazi's across the English Channel- lolhahaha!

 

But seriously, dude- what's with the lens? Are you trying to compensate for something?

 

Im shooting Surfing at a very long distance

 

take care


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#6 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:21 AM

 

The problem with the Bolex is that it doesn't really take the standard lightweight support bars, I don't know if you've got access to a machine shop, but it might be worth checking with Les Bosher if he's made a support system for the Bolex. http://www.lesbosher.co.uk/

 

Allthough from memory the 3 lens turret version has a screw in the body behind the lower lens opening that could be used for a support bar.

 

You may find that the tripod in your photo isn't great for long telephoto lens work. The current arrangement is front heavy, so you may wish to have a tripod mount fitted into the lens mounting system, so that the rig balances. You might manage a one off using metal in a simple  L type arrangement, a local machine shop should be able to do a one off, although if you've got the tools and the metal skills a DIY is possible

 

I assume you're using this for wildlife photography, stills camera telephoto lenses are extremely effective for this work.

Hi .. thanks for the reply !... Yes im shooting surfing at a very long distance .. im getting a Miller tripod soon .. That bolex tripod its kind of bad .. I just emailed Lesbosner.co .. many thanks


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#7 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:43 PM

 

The problem with the Bolex is that it doesn't really take the standard lightweight support bars

 

Flatbase Bolex models can theoretically be mounted on any aftermarket bridgeplate with rods and a lens support, the only potential issues are centering the support to the lens and getting the support height right.

 

If you peel off the leatherette at the front of the flatbase there are 2 screw holes for mounting the Bolex mattebox rails, but they're too flimsy for supporting a long, heavy lens. For that purpose Bolex released the Light Optical Bench (code SUTEL), with sturdier rods, an adjustable V-shaped lens support and an intermediate support that mounted to the head so the camera/lens could be properly balanced.

See http://shikan.org/Mo.../Bolex-Support/

 

You could probably build up something similar with other systems that are available, maybe just need to get a machine shop to make up a few extra bits.


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#8 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:28 PM

What do u guys think of this

 

http://www.ebay.com/...984.m1438.l2649


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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 02:18 AM

I suspect the problem is that the optical centre is higher on a Bolex than a DSLR.


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#10 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 02:59 AM

What do u guys think of this

 

http://www.ebay.com/...984.m1438.l2649

 

That one might sort of work, but there are issues, like the height of the optical centre as Brian mentions, and the fact that the optical centre is also offset from the camera's mounting threads in the base. 

 

A few measurements to keep in mind:

 

SBM height from base to lens mount centre is 107mm. So if the lens is say 100mm diameter (50mm radius) at the point of support, the lens support needs to rise 57mm above the camera base. The rods are mounted below the camera base, on that example maybe 50mm below, so the total rise you'd need (without doing some sort of modification) is over 100mm. You could choose a support point where the lens diameter is larger, requiring less of a rise, but the rubber strap might not reach around.

 

The lens mount centre is offset by 24.7mm from the rear 3/8" camera securing thread, or 18.7mm from the front 3/8" and middle 1/4" ones (if I'm reading the dimension specs properly). So you really need to be able to shift the camera (or lens support) to one side. Either that or mount the camera/lens at a slight angle, in which case the lens support will sit a little skewed under the lens.

 

A little creative modification might be in order!


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#11 Christopher Sheneman

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 04:01 AM

Hi .. thanks for the reply !... Yes im shooting surfing at a very long distance .. im getting a Miller tripod soon .. That bolex tripod its kind of bad .. I just emailed Lesbosner.co .. many thanks

Why don't you ask the surfers if you can film them instead of creeping around on shore with a giant telephoto?


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#12 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 05:45 AM

Why don't you ask the surfers if you can film them instead of creeping around on shore with a giant telephoto?

 

Surfers like being filmed.  You probably don't have to ask them.  The long lenses come up because many good breaks are a long way from the shore.


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#13 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 05:58 AM

Why don't you ask the surfers if you can film them instead of creeping around on shore with a giant telephoto?

the surfers are my friends ..why don't u stop writing creepy messages


Edited by Tin Drugmoneyart, 05 July 2013 - 05:58 AM.

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#14 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 06:22 AM

You may get some long term useful value from the suport rig if it conforms to one of the standards.  Meaning rod size,  spacing and position relative to the lens axis.  From what Dom says on the lens height,  and just looking at the physical size of the lens you are using,   You should go for 19mm rod geometry.  The 100mm studio rod geom may work,  but you would need steel rods rather than aluminium.  Bear in mind that the stiffness rather than strength is normally the governing design issue.

 

O'Connor have a nice drawing showing the different rod geometries relative to the lens axis.
http://www.ocon.com/...-standards.html

 

If you can befriend someone with a basic mill/drill you could probably cook something up in 2-4 hours.   I have seen some inexpensive 19mm rod bases that were mass produced,  probably for the Red camera owners.   But you really need a smallish base for the camera,  a larger base for the tripod and a small base to sit your lens support on.   These three can shift along the some long 19mm rods to give the support and balance that you need.  So cheaper to build it yourself.  For the surfing shoot rig you may not have many configuration changes,  so you could just use set screws rather than clamps to fix the roods.  Meaning use your thumb screws as set screws.  Not as good as clamps,  just a lot easier to make if you are in a hurry.

 

Re the tripod.  Get something big.  O'Connor 50s are cheap.

 

Cheers,
Gregg.
PS.  Didn't they make you change your name yet?


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#15 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 06:45 AM

Looking again at your photo.  Where are the possible places to locate the support on the lens.  It's hard to read the photo.  If the support is forced towards the rear,  maybe you could just make a heavy aluminum cheeze plate out of something like 75x12mm section.  The camera base  and the lens support are screwed to the cheeze plate.   Threaded holes go along most of the length so you can mount on a tripod wherever you want.   Cheap,  quick,  easy to do. 


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#16 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 11:23 AM

Why don't you ask the surfers if you can film them instead of creeping around on shore with a giant telephoto?

 

The best surfing shots are often either at the end of a long telephoto or in the water riding with them using a wide angle lens.


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#17 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 03:15 PM

Why don't you ask the surfers if you can film them instead of creeping around on shore with a giant telephoto?

Greg thanks a lot .. its the name of my company . www.drugmoneyart.com


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#18 Tin Ojeda

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 03:58 PM

PS.  Didn't they make you change your name yet?

Greg thanks a lot .. its the name of my company . www.drugmoneyart.com


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#19 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 01:28 AM

You should use your full real name, not the name of your company. It's one of the forum rules.


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#20 Sabyasachi Patra

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 01:25 AM

The lens seems to be longer and heavier than the camera. Better to mount it on a dovetail with rods so that it can be moved forward and back and balanced and the rods can take the weight. Else slight vibration can result in this combo behaving like a tuning fork. I do wildlife filming and the OConnor fluid head and tripods lend a lot of stability.


Edited by Sabyasachi Patra, 16 July 2013 - 01:27 AM.

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