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Making a chinese lantern?

bulb types?

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#1 Karel Bata

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 02:10 PM

I've got a setup coming up with two 20" hanging Chinese lanterns in shot.
 
My first impulse was to get a pair of photofloods to put in them, put them on dimmers, and see how useful they were as a source. Could get hot though, and photoflood lamp life at full is around 5 hours(?)
 
Then I thought - why not use those new halogen lights that come encased within a conventional bulb housing? I could use a 100W, and get 150W worth of light out of it (am I correct?) with more lamp life, and less fire risk. I believe the plastic lamp fittings are rated at 150W max.
 
Any thoughts on this?
 
And is there a way to fireproof the lanterns? Or do I worry too much? :unsure:
 
 
Cheers! B)


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#2 Richard Sutcliffe

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 05:05 PM

Hi Karel, I recently created a studio lighting rig on a budget with Chinese Lanterns as an overhead soft source. We had eight 1m globes with 500w Tungsten bulbs inside. No problems with heat though we did cover the opening on the bottom with a bit of diffusion to kill hotspots and to stop and glass falling onto talent in the event of a bulb failure.

 

I've also looked at the flourescent option and found 150w 5600k bulbs which are equivalent of 500w tungsten (if you can accept those types of statements). There are splitters available which allow you to run two bulbs off one cord so with 2 150w flourescents you could get approx 1k soft source.


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#3 Karel Bata

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 05:16 PM

Thanks for the reply. The lantern size is down to them being practicals. I'm worried that they may not be diffuse enough and have a strong hot-spot. Wait n see I guess.

 

Yes, good idea about covering the bottom somehow - without it showing.

 

I'm avoiding the fluorescent option because of the green. You didn't see a problem?


Edited by Karel Bata, 15 July 2013 - 05:16 PM.

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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:52 AM

Kino now makes CFL bulbs which supposedly don't have the green-- or rather will be closer to kino tubes.

As for the bottom, I will often just cut a little 216 and throw it in there to kill that spot.


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#5 JD Hartman

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:43 AM

Short lifespan, high output, higher color temperature, higher cost is just the tradeoff of a Photoflood vs. a regular incandescent or CFL bulb.   Ususally you get what you pay for.  If you don't kill the lights during breaks, most Photofloods will exceed therir rated hours by a surprising margin.  I've tried the 150w medium base Halogen globes in a paper lantern and was less than impressed by the light output.   Ever watch the show Pawn Stars?  The entire store has paper lanterns being used as practicals in every shot.  If the fire risk was great, I doubt the owners of the shop would allow it..


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#6 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:47 AM

  If you don't kill the lights during breaks, most Photofloods will exceed therir rated hours by a surprising margin. 

Fading them up on a dimmer when switching them on (soft starting) can also help extend their life.


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#7 Karel Bata

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 12:08 PM

Thanks guys. They will be on a dimmer, and left dimmed a bit between shots.

 

Disappointing to hear the halogen bulbs aren't that great. I guess they don't benefit from a reflector and lens like you'd get in a fresnel. Well, there's always adding conventional lights from elsewhere.

 

The Kino CFLs look rather good, and not too expensive. I might buy some. I'll see how the halogens perform first.

 

Oh, and the health and safety guys have been looking at this and say we need an earth bond running to the C-Stands that support the lanterns. Oh yawn.


Edited by Karel Bata, 16 July 2013 - 12:08 PM.

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#8 JD Hartman

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 12:22 PM

Fading them up on a dimmer when switching them on (soft starting) can also help extend their life.

 

Most globes fail when switched on, so using a dimmer may alleviate having to replace one at startup..  Will it extend their life to dim them at meal breaks?  Maybe.  Adding: 2; 5; 12; a dimmer rack, just adds one more link in the chain as a potential failure point.  If not determined to be necessary to achieve the "look", it's unnecessary fluff.   I would expect them to have a finite life, they will be discarded after the shoot day.  Pack some spares instead. 


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#9 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 05:38 PM

I have a Dove systems dimmer boards I normally run all the practicals to anymore; and china-balls as well, for quick adjustments and saves me on needing hand-dimmers for each unit Good for 10A/channel, 50A overall I believe. But I never get anywhere near that. Also i didn't buy it, it was from a previous shoot and they didn't want it anymore. Not the prettiest thing in the world; but very helpful for me at least.


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