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BBC - PBS Antique Roadshow from 90s and the Analysis of High Quality

Antique Roadshow

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#1 Mustafa Umut Sarac

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 06:47 PM

I am watching BBC and PBS Antique Roadshow programs from internet and tv. I am just a photographer and have some Leicas and know about seeing image quality.

 

I dont know why but 90s editions have a Dutch Painting Quality Light spreaded everywhere. Images looks so stable and noise free. There is noone looks like a oily bright skin and close ups are catalog quality.

 

What is responsible for noise free , rock steady images , elegant colors and the elegant light spread ?

 

Why no more ? What kind of cameras and lenses they were using. Is VHS or BETA recording have a impact on quality ?

 

How someone accomplish such a quality with post processing ?

 

Thank you,

Umut


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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 07:18 PM

BBC Antiques Roadshow in the 90s would have been shot on DigiBeta probably with Canon ENG zooms. It's possible that parts of it were shot on DV-Cam.

 

It's a magazine type programme that typically shot a 30 min episode in a couple of days. It certainly wasn't ever regarded as having high production values or looking particularly good.


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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 08:25 PM

Didn't they used to take out studio cameras on that and iso them all on a truck?


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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 09:12 PM

Didn't they used to take out studio cameras on that and iso them all on a truck?

Possibly. I could be confusing that show with one of the other 400 Antiques shows the BBC has...

 

Tech specs would have been the same though.


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#5 Mustafa Umut Sarac

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 10:01 PM

Hello Phil Rhodes , What did you mean with studio cameras , are they digital or film ?

 

Umut


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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:17 PM

Video, more than likely Digibeta for the time peroid.


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#7 Mustafa Umut Sarac

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:27 PM

I am seeing big difference between yesterday and now at the image quality. Can you please shed a light why colors were elegant , basic aberrations least and the illumination was superior to todays episodes.

 

I read about YUV and no compression at camera yesterday.but I am not expert. May be 90s are too early , let say before and after 2002.

 

Thank you very much , every bit of information is very important for me.

Is there a books which can tell me the reason ?

 

Umut


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#8 Freya Black

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 11:04 AM

Possibly. I could be confusing that show with one of the other 400 Antiques shows the BBC has...

 

Tech specs would have been the same though.

 

Antiques Road Show was the original show from years ago before this kind of programming took off.

There has been a lot of changes over the years in working practices. It's possible as Phil says, that they had proper studio cameras hooked up to an OB truck in the past and that now they have moved over to using 2/3" camcorders or worse.

 

In UK factual there is generally also a trend towards casting, editing, self shooting, researchers too.

 

Freya


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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 11:31 AM

Bear in mind that most studio cameras are also 2/3" CCD cameras, which is why you can put a GH2 on the back of a big box lens with an adaptor - it's still a B4 mount, albeit supplemented with additional lens power and data option usually on a separate connector. There isn't a huge performance offset compared to a high quality camera such as a DVW-790 (the archetypal digital betacam camera still widely used in the UK). The enormous box lenses might conceivably be better, but most of that size is dedicated to making them fast and providing an enormous range of focal lengths.

 

Nothing special. Just normal OB camerawork.


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#10 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 02:55 PM

OBs like that would most likely have used dockable 2/3" camera heads tethered by triax to a vision mixer, and recorded out to a DigiBeta deck, or Betacam SP before that. The big studio lenses may have been used, but it's more likely that ENG zooms were used for portability and weight reasons.


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#11 Freya Black

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 02:35 PM

Bear in mind that most studio cameras are also 2/3" CCD cameras, which is why you can put a GH2 on the back of a big box lens with an adaptor - it's still a B4 mount, albeit supplemented with additional lens power and data option usually on a separate connector. There isn't a huge performance offset compared to a high quality camera such as a DVW-790 (the archetypal digital betacam camera still widely used in the UK). The enormous box lenses might conceivably be better, but most of that size is dedicated to making them fast and providing an enormous range of focal lengths.

 

Nothing special. Just normal OB camerawork.

 

Well yes, but I was suggesting the 2/3" camcorders might be the high end, i.e. they might be using something worse.

Also the studio cameras could also be B3 mount too, in fact that was probably quite common some time ago. Could be a switch between Ikegami cameras to Sony as well. Who can say. I did hear that someone was shooting the new series on a Sony F5 tho.

 

Freya


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#12 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 12:14 PM

The make of OB cameras used would depend on which cameras a particular BBC region's OB unit was equipped with, but in the 1990s they'd be 2/3" CCD. Sony, Philips or Ikegami could be possible makes.

 

Any single camera production would be Digibeta towards the end of the 90's or Betacam SP during the early part.  


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