Jump to content


Photo

Keystone K-50 camera, can it use both a 50ft & 100ft 16mm mag


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Ane Singleton

Ane Singleton

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 24 July 2013 - 02:27 AM

 I am about to buy a Keystone Mayfair K-50 16mm camera and very curious about the film magazine that it uses.  I've read that it takes a 50ft magazine, but the 100ft magazine seems to be the standard availability now.  Can this camera magazine casing fit 100ft 16mm film? I need your knowledge and experience.


Edited by Ane Singleton, 24 July 2013 - 02:29 AM.

  • 0

#2 Dom Jaeger

Dom Jaeger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1599 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 24 July 2013 - 10:20 AM

The 50ft magazines that camera takes are a pre-loaded sort of cartridge, a bit like how you get Super 8 film. They haven't been made for decades, some people re-load old ones with new film but it's not a simple thing to do and you're limited to 2R (perforated on both edges) filmstock. So unless you're a collector or a somewhat experienced enthusiast willing to spend hours fiddling in the dark those old 'magazine cameras' are pretty worthless. The main reason people might buy one these days is just for the C-mount lenses.

 

You're better off getting a camera that takes 100ft daylight spools which are still readily available. Something like a Bolex H16, Canon Scoopic or Krasnogorsk K-3. 

 

More professional film cameras use removeable, easily loaded film chambers for larger loads (often 400 ft for 16mm) that are also called magazines and are part of the camera kit, so the term can be confusing.


  • 0

#3 Ane Singleton

Ane Singleton

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 24 July 2013 - 10:52 PM

Your reply is great Dom.  Disappointing, but honest.  The price for the K-50 is so reasonable that I might give it a go simply because it comes with such nice lenses and a few good accessories, and who knows I might end up fiddling with the reload option, but I sure wish that the film availability was different. 

 

Can you give me the film verdict on two cameras that I already own, and one that I am about to acquire?  These cameras are the finds that I come across for very reasonable prices.   But film availability is crucial, and I am not in this to be a collector at this point.  I'm hoping to use the cameras I acquire.

 

Elmo Super 8 C-200   (came with an unopened Kodachrome 40 cartridge)

Bell and Howell 252 8mm  (hand crank)

Bell and Howell Director Series (hand crank) film on reels

 

The cameras that you recommended are on my list, but the above are the starting point for my budget and short films. 

 

Thank you Dom


  • 0

#4 Dom Jaeger

Dom Jaeger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1599 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 25 July 2013 - 02:58 AM

If you're still interested in the Keystone you can try contacting Java Photo (http://www.javaphoto.com/filmpage.html) who advertise 50ft magazines loaded with B&W negative, but I don't know how up-to-date their webpage is. 

 

I don't know too much about the S8 Elmo, other than what you could find yourself doing a google search. Like all S8 cameras it takes S8 carts that are readily available, but if you want automatic exposure you'd need to source a replacement for the original PX25 3.9V mercury battery that powers the internal light meter, and it probably won't read correctly anyway for modern film stocks above 100 ISO. You could just use it manually though, using your own light meter. Unlike the other 2 cameras it's a reflex camera, which makes focussing and framing easier.

 

The Bell & Howell 252 is a very basic 8mm camera that takes 25ft spools of Double 8 film, which are still available (though very limited in stock choice these days). Try John Schwind if you're in the US:

http://www.zerelda.c...tionalfilm.html

 

The Director's Series Bell & Howell cameras are later, better quality 8mm cameras that also take Double 8 film on spools (some models are also 'magazine' types, so watch out for that). I've got a spool model and was quite impressed with how steady the image was. If you're lucky the meter still works and you can use the camera set to automatic exposure. No batteries required, even for the motorised zoom! One of these cameras (a magazine version) was used by Zapruder to film the Kennedy assassination.

 

Super 8 is a far more popular medium than the older Double 8 (also called Standard 8 or Regular 8), you have much more film stock choices and the cameras are almost all reflex viewing and battery powered and easy to use. But I personally love Double 8 for a number of reasons.


  • 0

#5 Ane Singleton

Ane Singleton

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 27 July 2013 - 02:00 AM

Dom you really know your cameras and film stock. 

 

You provided several answers to key topics before I knew the questions would arise, one of those was your mentioning of the S8 Elmo and the battery.  

 

The sources that you provided are more than helpful.  And it is good to know your experience with the B&H Director's Series.   You must know that I have more questions, but for now I will follow up on all that you have provided.

 

Ane 


  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Opal

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

CineLab

Tai Audio

Abel Cine