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Help identifying and dating 16mm PlusX rev and TriX neg.


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#1 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 05:34 PM

I was basically given a few old rolls of 16mm PlusX reversal and TriX neg.  It has been sound striped by Zonastripe and canned as 200' daylight spools.    The only info stuck to the cans,  typed on a small piece of paper and cellotaped on is...

 

MAGNETIC SOUND STRIPE
PLUS X REVERSAL
CONTROL No. 1341

 

TRI -X  NEG.
ZONAL REF:53474

or sometimes 53475

 

So is there any way of knowing what stock this actually is,  or of estimating its age based on these  Zonastripe numbers,  or the dates within which Zonastripe were active.

If I process some will the edge numbers or other info on that edge give some clue?

 

Thanks,
Gregg.


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#2 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 03:44 AM

You could develop up a short section, the only problem might be the balance stripe covering up the edge print.  If so you can remove the stripe, if it is paste stripe, with a solvent such as perklone.  You might find methylated spirit will work.  If it is a cemented stripe (rather unlikely, I think) then the solvents will not remove them.

Brian


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#3 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 03:47 AM

Second thoughts, as it is camera stock it might be cemented stripe so that it can be cleaned.  You can't clean paste stripe with solvents as it will come off.  You might still be able to read the edge code even if it is cemented stripe.

Brian


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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:40 AM

Presumably you only need to know the age to assess the condition. A clip test will do that anyway.


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#5 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:10 PM

Brian,
I'm pretty sure it is a "paste stripe".  I think the balance stripe on the perf edge will hide the top half of the edge number.   Like you suggest,  something will disolve that off so we could have a look.

 

Years ago I hand processed lots of PlusX (as neg),  which,  from memory had variation in the type of  info and or formatting on the edge,  so I thought this might  help identify or date the stock.   I just dug out a large roll comprised of very short camera rolls shot in the late 80s on my home made optical printer.   Trying to keep it clean,  I just grabed the first edge data I saw.  

 

Written in tiny upper case right near the edge was   KODAK   PXR    +  0   4 9  SAFETY FILM

Then just after,  jamed between the perfs was  J1 74 46   911.
The J1 was written above the 74,  both in small font.

Mark,
Yes,  that true.  I think I may have to clip test all these rolls.  My processing gear has been in hybernation in the basement for 17 years.  Time to dig it out I suppose.


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#6 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 12:54 PM

Gregg

The J1/74  46 911 is the footage number.  The + could well be the date code (1969)

Brian


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#7 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:15 PM

 

Gregg
The J1/74  46 911 is the footage number.  The + could well be the date code (1969)
Brian


So only 44 years old then. The stuff I processed in the 80s may have been only 24 years old?

When I got this film recently I assumed that the TriX would be no good. The old chap selling it said that if I process as reversal the base fog issue goes away. I had to think about that. I only have processed as neg before. I think it makes sense, the base fog will dissapear with all the other exposed emulsion. Thinking again, does it mran that our highlights are ok, but our blacks are now lifted by the fogg, so no longer black?

Cheers,
Gregg
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#8 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 02:30 AM

Yes Greg, the higher the fog level the lower the maximum black with reversal processing.  Hopefully the maximum black is capable of losing a bit of density without unduly affecting the picture quality too much.

Brian


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