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True HD and distribution


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#1 stephen solar

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:36 PM

I was reading an article in "Movie Maker" and this article was about brick and mortar distribution companies. The question was asked what are some tips to filmmakers to help their work get distributed and a rep said to try and film everything in true HD, This made me wonder if, for example, you crop your footage to 1920x816 for scope AR or if you film in 2x ana then crop off the sides to get a less extreme wide aspect does that mean you're footage is no longer true HD?


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 07:33 PM

It's not very well-defined, "true" HD, at best all you can say is that the footage should hold up on a large HD monitor and you should have the option of delivering a full-frame 16x9 version even for the 2.40 movies.  I saw a low-budget movie on the SyFy Channel shot on the Canon 5D, and even though HD on a DSLR doesn't quite resolve HD if you measure it, it held up fine on my 47" HDTV screen and clearly the distributor was OK with the quality.  But some markets are pickier about technical quality than others.


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#3 George Ebersole

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 11:05 PM

Japan is one such market.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 12:42 AM

Some people define "true" HD as 1920 x 1080, as opposed to 1280 x 720.


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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 02:00 AM

It also depends if you're planning a theatrical or just a HD TV Channel combined with DVD etc. I suspect if you're not likely to get a theatrical distribution (most film don't), it probably doesn't make sense to shoot scope, especially if you're shooting on a DSLR.  

 

Feature films are bought in, but productions commissioned for flagship HD channels do have standards that are now similar built around 1920 x 1080. Some will transmit scope films in the correct ratio, while most won't..

 

By cropping you're compromising the framing, by some degree, on HDTV.

 

.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 03 August 2013 - 02:05 AM.

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