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Kodak Vision 500 on a Canon 518


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#1 Wayne Jones

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 09:31 AM

Anyone know if the Canon 518 will meter for this film properly? Also the problem with the internal filter; If a  film is say a daylight type; how is it possible to use it both inside and outside if the filter is controlled primarily by the notch in the  cartridge  or the lack of it? The way I understand it, the internal pin cancells out the external filter switch usage. For some reason I find the use of the internal filter a bit confusing.


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#2 David Cunningham

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 10:54 AM

Depends which 518 you have. There were a few different cameras with this number. This is the most common:

http://www.super8dat...18_autozoom.htm

Is that yours?

If so, it will not correctly expose 500T. However, if you are shooting 500T indoors under low light it probably will be fine. 500T has a crazy amount of latitude. In your case it would expose as 160 which is about 1 and 2/3s of a stop over exposed. It may blow out bright highlights in things like white walls or lamp shades and you might lighten a subjects skin tone a bit. But, it would otherwise be fine.

Most super 8 cameras have a switch to enable or disable the filter. I always keep my filter disabled and if using a tungsten film outdoors I put on an external filter. After 30 or more years that little internal plastic filter is likely in bad shape.

If its daylight film, you will need an 80 filter indoors unless you have daylight (5500K) lighting. Don't bother with using 50D indoors, it will be just too dark especially with a filter. You'd need at least 200T. Daylight film auto cancels the internal filter as you would never need or want it.

If you are concerned about indoors, use some 200T which will expose over by 1/3 which is actually a good thing. 500 will still likely be fine, but 200 better. Outdoors, 50D will be great in bright light.
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#3 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 03:11 AM

Also the problem with the internal filter; If a  film is say a daylight type; how is it possible to use it both inside and outside if the filter is controlled primarily by the notch in the  cartridge  or the lack of it?

 

The internal filter can only be used for tungsten balanced films when shooting outdoors with sunlight.

 

When you've got a daylight-balanced film and want to shoot indoors with "artificial light", you can't use the internal filter. (And this is not due to the design of the Super8-camera, but due to the "design" of the film!) So you'll have to put an "external" filter in front of your lens. In most cases you'll need a Wratten 80A. However this heavily depends on your actual light source and your film. Example (quote from the "technical data" for the KODAK VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207 / 7207):

 


Color Balance
These films are balanced for exposure with daylight illumination (5500K). For other light sources, use the correction filters in the table below.

 

Light Source                                    KODAK Filters on Camera *
Daylight (5500 K)                      None
Metal Halide                             None
H.M.I.                                      None
KINO FLO 55                           None
Tungsten (3000 K)                    WRATTEN 2 Optical Filter / 80A
Tungsten (3200 K)                    WRATTEN 2 Optical Filter / 80A
KINO FLO 29/KINO FLO 32      WRATTEN 2 Optical Filter / 80A
Fluorescent, Warm White †      Color Compensating CC20M + CC05R
Fluorescent, Cool White †        Color Compensating CC40B

 

* These are approximate corrections only. Make final corrections during printing.
† These are starting-point recommendations for trial exposures. If the kind of lamp is unknown, a KODAK Color Compensating Filter CC20M + CC10B can be used with an exposure index (EI) of 125.


Edited by Joerg Polzfusz, 05 August 2013 - 03:13 AM.

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