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Processing Wittnerchrome 200D


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#1 Milica Jovcic

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 06:15 AM

Hello!

 

Does anyone has experience with home processing new Wittner Super 8? I used to work with Tetenal chemistry and Ektachrome stock. Is there some differences in developing Chrome 200D and where should I pay attention during processing.

 

Thank you very much and regards,

 

Milica

 


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#2 Heikki Repo

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 06:27 AM

There should be no differences. It is same E-6 process as Ektachrome.


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#3 Milica Jovcic

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 06:47 AM

Thank you very much!


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#4 Jeremy Cavanagh

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 01:43 PM

Developed a roll of Wittner 200D super 8 using E6 from Tetenal and had a strange outcome where after hanging it to dry we found the emulsion to be milky as though it hadn't developed. However, over the next 30 minutes the milkiness cleared as we watched and a strong clear image emerged. Now I am a novice in developing film so it could've been something myself and the friend working with me had done but earlier that day using the same chemistry we developed a roll of Ektachrome 100D and it had been clear as soon as we opened up the top of the Lomo tank. As well a film archivist was with us plus an artist experienced in developing both positive and negative film and neither of them had seen this sort of thing.


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#5 Friedemann Wachsmuth

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 09:21 AM

The blue-ish milkyness when it is wet is normal. Its Polyester base.
The Wittner 200D is easy to develop, very tolerant against imperfect timings, has a pretty stable emulsion (not coming off) and turns out very well.

Edited by Friedemann Wachsmuth, 13 September 2013 - 09:21 AM.

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#6 Jeremy Cavanagh

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 02:53 PM

The blue-ish milkyness when it is wet is normal. Its Polyester base.

Thankyou for that information, very useful. I will pass it on.


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#7 Milica Jovcic

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 03:29 AM

Yes, thank you! It will a help a lot and prevent a first moment of panic with milkyness look.

 

Plese, tell me just one more thing: is it the same steps and durations with Wittner stock and Tetenal E-6 (as it was with Ektachrome)?


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#8 Jeremy Cavanagh

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 06:26 AM

 

 

Plese, tell me just one more thing: is it the same steps and durations with Wittner stock and Tetenal E-6 (as it was with Ektachrome)?

We processed it no differently from the Tetenal instructions i.e. we had a moment's doubt about processing times between 100D and 200D (no doubt due to our lack of experience) but plunged in. I am enjoying self processing but only have access every few months or so but can imagine doing this on rainy Sunday afternoons with BBC R4 on in the background as it seems to evoke the same calm in me as concentrating on lining up or lighting a shot.


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#9 Friedemann Wachsmuth

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 04:12 PM

Yup, just standard E6.
The first impression when its wet is indeed shocking, but once it has dried it is really beautiful.
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Aerial Filmworks

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Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport