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REGARDING DIGITAL MOVIE OUT PUT

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#1 saicharan

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 12:03 PM

HI SIR,

 

CAN ANY ONE SUGGEST ME THE EASIEST AND MOST RELIABLE WAYS FOR THE FOLLOWING ...

 

1. FUTURE FILM QUALITY USING THE DIGITAL CAMERAS LIKE REDMX, EPIC AND ARRIALEXA...

 

2. LENSES THAT SUPPORT FOR MAKING THIS MOVIES IN A LOW BUDGET...

 

3. EXPOSURE LEVELS THAT SHOLD BE MAINTAINED IN BRINGING THE FUTURE FILM QUALITY...

 

4. CONVENIENT WAYS FOR D.I OUTPUT TO GIVE HIGH RANGE OF FUTURE FILM QUALITY...


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 12:06 PM

WHAT IS "FUTURE FILM QUALITY"??? AND WHY ARE WE SHOUTING???


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#3 saicharan

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 12:18 PM

FUTURE FILM QUALITY MEAN.... THEATRE OUTPUT...


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 02:45 PM

Your question is too broad for a forum answer.  You basically are asking how to shoot a feature using a digital camera for theatrical release (workflow, exposure, post-production, etc.)

 

Generally a theatrical digital master would be 2K or 4K RGB, often in uncompressed 10-bit Log DPX files, and a version color-corrected for P3 color space would be created to make a 2K or 4K DCP (Digital Cinema Package.)  

 

Cheaper and somewhat less good would be to finish the project in 1080P HD video and use that to make a theatrical version.  And there are all sorts of quality levels of HD -- I'm talking about something at the level of HDCAM-SR, minimal compression, 4:4:4 color, 10-bit Log, etc., not some consumer grade of HD.

 

All sorts of lenses are used to make movies, old and new, good and bad, depends on the look you want for the movie.  Movies don't have one look.

 

Best exposure, assuming you want a fairly low-noise image, is whatever minimizes clipping from overexposure but also avoids noise from underexposure.  Since different cameras have different sensitivities, there is no one way to best expose all of them.  If you hire an experienced cinematographer, he should know how to expose the image for the quality you want.


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#5 dan kessler

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 08:58 PM

Dare I say it?  If you want to assure future film quality, shoot on 35mm film.
Outputs to ANY format past, present or future, the benchmark in quality, best archivability.


Edited by dan kessler, 16 September 2013 - 08:59 PM.

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Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

The Slider

Technodolly

Wooden Camera