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Moonrise Kingdom 200t unfiltered


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#1 Elias Markkula

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:58 AM

Hi,

 

Robert Yeoman says in this article that they shot the whole film with vision3 200t stock and did not use any filtration besides an ND filter. 

 

http://www.studiodai...onrise-kingdom/

 

So it's good to shoot tungsten stocks in daylight without 85 filter and correct in post?

 


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#2 Paul Bartok

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 06:16 AM

You could but It just seems lazy not todo it, I think you also affect the grain doing that though Im not 100% sure on that
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#3 Elias Markkula

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 06:46 AM

Do you think that they made the choice of shooting unfiltered because of lazyness?


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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 08:28 AM

David Mullen will explain it better, but you get a very underexposed blue record, so one assumes a very grainy sky.


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 10:36 AM

They probably made that choice in order to shoot as much of the movie on 200T stock even in bad weather, to save on the 2/3-stop loss of the 85, plus it sounds like they wanted a lot of depth of field and stopped down when possible.

 

Sort of the opposite, by pulling the 85 filter outside, you have an overexposed blue record and underexposed reds.  Correcting that tends to get you noisier reds, and if you overexposed the blue sky too much, some scanner noise in the blues.  But film has a lot of latitude.

 

I'm just surprised they didn't use the 85 filter -- pulling it is more common for movies that want a cooler cast (I didn't use an 85 filter on "Northfork" for example, it helpded pull some color out of the faces.)  In this case, the movie was digitally timed for a warm yellowish look so you'd have to push the channels past the blue to neutral correction even farther towards the yellow-red end.  But obviously the film negative held up fine to that.  It sounds like, from reading the ASC article, that the director decided on a warmer look than originally planned while shooting.

 

"Barry Lyndon" and "Heat" are famous movies that were shot on tungsten stock without the 85 filters.


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#6 John Holland

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:46 PM

Most of my work has been in UK, where i stopped using a 85 in the 80's just needed that extra speed without the 2/3 stop loss. If i am  shooting in a country with lot of sun and fantastic blue skies as i did in India March this year then yes i did use 85 and 85ND's .And yes its so easy to correct in post even more so now.


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