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Help with Hanimex Super 8 Zoom Projector

projector film thread help

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#1 Martin Pizzy

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 12:01 PM

New member here.

 

I have been given an old Hanimex Super 8 Zoom projector, but cannot understand how the film is actually supposed to be projected, the spools are not in the right place for the film to pass between the light and the lens... Please see the photos below...

 

Also, if anyone spots anything else I've done wrong, please let me know! (I know the film is loose in most of the shots, I just put it there for show)

 

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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 12:20 PM

It does look very odd. Every projector I have seen has the sprocket in line with the gate.

The film must be intended to enter and leave the gate at an angle.

Thread over the top of the sprocket, as you have it already, through the gate, under the bottom of the sprocket as you have it already,  then onto the takeup spool. Be sure to form a loop above and below the gate.

Try a bit of scrap film first.


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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 01:06 PM

thread.jpg


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#4 Martin Pizzy

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 02:05 PM

Ah I think you may have misunderstood...

 

The problem is that the gate is not actually inline with the sprocket, therefore the film has no way of going in front of the light.. maybe this photo will explain better, this view is from above:

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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 02:10 PM

I haven't misunderstood.

Try what I suggested with some scrap film.


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#6 Martin Pizzy

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 02:42 PM

It works! It's weird but it works! Haha thank you very much  :D

 

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#7 Mark Dunn

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 07:01 AM

Very peculiar.

You can probably make the loops a bit smaller, particularly at the bottom, so there's no chance of the film rubbing on the housing.

I would want to be sure that any splices were particularly carefully made and I would be watching closely whilst the film was running.

This was obviously an attempt to make a cheap mechanism. In the long term you might want to look out for something more conventional. You don't need me to tell you that your reversal camera originals are very precious and that you can't be too careful with them.


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#8 Adele Telford Bahan

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 09:09 AM

I know this is an old post but I'm hoping you can help. I have one of these which is working fine but I need to rewind a film. The film is currently showing people upside down and walking backwards. How do I get it the right way around? Thanks
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#9 Mark Dunn

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 09:13 AM

You shouldn't be able to run it because the perfs will be on the wrong wide, but assuming that you have put a twist in it to get it to project, you are showing it tail to head.

Just rewind it.


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#10 Adele Telford Bahan

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 12:42 PM

I'm sorry, I don't understand? Could you elaborate? I really don't understand these and appreciate any help. It belonged to my grandad and there are videos of us as children so Obviously I am very interested to get it working properly. Thanks for your help :)
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#11 Mark Dunn

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 01:31 PM

If you are seeing people upside down, you are running the film from the end to the beginning. Rewind it. Then you will be able to project it properly.

Refer to the photograph above. Run the film from one spool to the other without threading it through the mechanism. Or just follow the instructions.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 18 May 2015 - 01:33 PM.

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#12 Adele Telford Bahan

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 04:46 PM

Thanks for your help. I did that and got the film onto the other spool but then what? The film seems to be threaded the wrong way around and won't fit on the mechanism. Again, sorry for being a novice!
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#13 Simon Wyss

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 09:10 AM

Hello, friends, not to offend anybody nor to appear as the smart-arse I am anyhow, let me suggest an idea. I should rather give the film helicoidal or turn-over loops, if that’s the right expression. It would relieve some stress from the film.

 

This is not the only such projector. Some might remember the Victor Animatograph and Animatophone that also have the sprocket out of line with the gate but turn-over loops wouldn’t have been meant to be set. Helicoidal loops were well known with a number of motion-picture cameras or magazines thereof, namely Newman & Guardia, Debrie, Milliken DBM or Redlake Locam. They’re also named climbing loops. Why not make use of the film’s flexibility, if it allows better or cheaper designs?


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