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Stills film as a motion picture film


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#1 Pavan Deep

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:06 AM

There seems to be some colour film and a lot of in black and white available in the 35mm format in bulk 100ft lengths for photographers. I know 100ft will only yield about a minute of screen time at 24fps and as such may not be that useful for many. I have heard that stills film may not run smoothly in a movie camera at high speeds because it lacks the right lubrication, I have also read that there is a difference in the size and shape of perforations between stills film and motion picture film. I know cameras such as the Konvas and Kinor work fine with ‘normal’ motion picture film but they are deigned to work with film that has the still film’s perforations. I just wonder if has tried it the other way and have used stills film in cameras that are designed to run motion picture film, like the Arri, Aaton, Moviecam and even Eyemo’s? ? It would be nice to try some of Ilford’s black and white stock. The only real advantage of using any stills film is that it can be easily and very cheaply processed at home.

 

Pav

 

 


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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:31 AM

Processing 100' at a time would be a tall order.


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#3 Zac Fettig

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:58 AM

I thought the Eyemo was designed for 100' loads.
 

http://en.wikipedia....m_sprockets.png

 

Most 35mm motion-picture camera films are B&H perf, at least in Kodak's current lineup.

 

I think that most bulk still camera films (and I might be wrong) lack remjet. Which is used for lubrication and to minimize light leaking through the film.
 

I know most slide film does.

 


Edited by Zac Fettig, 15 October 2013 - 12:03 PM.

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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:50 PM

The OP is talking about 100' loads.

 

The KS perf was introduced for prints, to reduce wear and noise, and later adopted for stills film. It was never intended to run in a cine camera.

No, stills films don't usually have remjet, but most b/w neg stocks have a grey tint to the base which performs the same function. It comes out in the wash, so to speak.. Colour stills stocks can't have that so they would be susceptible to halation and light-piping, but I think the OP is more interested in b/w anyway.

However remjet is also anti-static and lubricating, which is important when the film is moving at 24fps but wouldn't be with stills. SO there is that problem.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 15 October 2013 - 01:54 PM.

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#5 Pavan Deep

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:55 PM

Processing 100 foot is not too difficult. The C41 process used for print film is very easy as is processing black and white, [E6 slide film] is tricky this is what I have done so far, processing Super 8 film.

 

The Eyemo does take 100ft loads and is BH perfed, I have tried it with exposed print film that is KS perfed and there seems to be no issues. Apparently colour print negative film has a backing layer which dissolves during processing, as far as I know the Remjet's main purpose is to make the film move when filming at higher speeds. As I said the only reason to use print film is due to its ease of processing.

 

Pav


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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 02:29 AM

Gigabitfilm 40 was not originally produced for motion-picture use but since its

first run through an ARRIFLEX 35 BL II in 2002, BH perf., 24 f. p. s.,

you can shoot on and process it at will. Available in 100-ft. length

 

Stock and chemistry from Mr. Ludwig, Kreuzau, Germany

http://www.gigabitfilm.de


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