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Glow w/ fog filters or in the DI?

filters fog diffusion color grading glow

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#1 Khalil Omer

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 07:02 PM

I have a shoot coming up where the director wants it to have that glow look made popular in shows like The West Wing and used recently in the Coen Brothers' Inside Llewyn Davis. The look in question has blown out, glowing highlights and a generally diffused image. 

 

I know how to do this effect in camera with filters and somewhat hard lighting and can also instruct the colorist to apply the effect in post. I've never done a whole show with this look so was wondering what DPs experienced with the look thought was the better method of achieving it. 


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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 08:10 PM

I prefer to do it in camera, always in camera. I have done it in post, and for me, it's not the same.

Normally, I'll always have the lightest diffusion on for wide shots, just to keep the look, and I may go heavier as I move in-- though normally not by much, as I don't want it overly diffused.


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#3 Khalil Omer

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 09:30 PM

I prefer to do it in camera, always in camera. I have done it in post, and for me, it's not the same.

Normally, I'll always have the lightest diffusion on for wide shots, just to keep the look, and I may go heavier as I move in-- though normally not by much, as I don't want it overly diffused.

 

Thanks Adrian. I was leaning in that direction and after trying some test grading of different clips I agree that in camera is the way to go on this one. 


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 10:55 PM

I'd split the difference, use light diffusion like a 1/4 ProMist, you can always enhance it further in post. At least with some mild diffusion on the lens you can see how it interacts with the lighting and overexposure.
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