Jump to content


Photo

Interiour, night, with "yellow" practicals and blue moonlight

night interiour

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 There Yougo

There Yougo

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 November 2013 - 02:25 PM

Hi!

I am going to shoot the following situation:

 

2 people in the middle of a big room (sitting at a table)

1 person far away from them, kind of in the same room, watching the people at the table from "out of the shadows" (=they can't see this person)

 

 

Looking at the room from the "voyeurs" perspective, I can see the two people in the middle of the room. On the right side, there is 2 big windows.

 

I would like to have a practical or two in the shot. They would be the main light. I'd probably add some fill from the front, too. Then, I'd like to let some blue-green (Roger Deakins style night-time light) light come from outside the windows.

Only problem: The room is too high up, I can't light from outside.

My idea: Install a pole cat / autopole and hang a 1ft 1bank KinoFlo over each of the 2 windows and gel them blue. Blackwrap the endings to avoid spill on the sides and put a louvre on it to shine "forward".

 

Would that work? / Look good?

I'm a little afraid, there would be too much spill from the Kinoflos being soft. Also: As the windows would be in the wide shot, wouldn't it be a little strange, that the actors and the room are lit blue, but the curtains in front of the window, as the windows itself, are completely black?

 

 

The "voyeur" would be lit blue, maybe having only a yellow kicker light.

 

Thanks!


  • 0

#2 Tim Tyler

Tim Tyler

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1291 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Olympia, WA (US)

Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:12 PM

You're not going to get much light from a 1' KinoFlo and it will be very diffused. Moonlight is hard and direct like sunlight.

 

How high are the windows? Is there a pole or a building across the street you can put a par light on?

 

A photo of the whole room would be helpful here.


  • 0

#3 There Yougo

There Yougo

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:26 PM

Tom, I uploaded one picture. I actually haven't been to the apartment yet, and there is no pictures of the windows. I can only guess. I know, there is 2 of them in that room.

Attached Images

  • Lounge.jpg

  • 0

#4 There Yougo

There Yougo

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:32 PM

The photo is taken from within the room where the table with the two people will be. On the left side are two windows with curtains.

This is really low budget (the room may suggest otherwise... :-) ), so I have no option for a scissor from outside and there is also no building nor a pole I could use. Just trees and air.

 

Instead of the Kinoflo, would you suggest anything better given my options?

 

Also, it will be either the Scarlet on ASA 800 or the 5D Mark 3, shooting with T2,8. You think two 1' Kinoflos would be too weak?


Edited by There Yougo, 15 November 2013 - 03:33 PM.

  • 0

#5 Tim Tyler

Tim Tyler

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1291 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Olympia, WA (US)

Posted 15 November 2013 - 04:14 PM

Maybe have the moonlight enter the room from off-camera through imaginary windows.

 

Light the trees outside the window from the same direction and with the same color as your moonlight.


  • 0

#6 Guy Holt

Guy Holt
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 535 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Boston

Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:31 PM

You're not going to get much light from a 1' KinoFlo and it will be very diffused. Moonlight is hard and direct like sunlight.

 

The other thing to keep in mind is that in reality moonlight is the weakest of lights in that as soon as a room light is turned on  it vanishes.  For this reason it should only be seen in deep shadowed backgrounds. In that case you might consider rigging mirror or stiff mylar panels on your pole cats instead. If you than shoot a small HMI Fresnel or Blue Baby into the mirror panels, you can then redirect that hard blue light into the shadows in the background.

 

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting and Grip Sales and Rentals in Boston


  • 0


Tai Audio

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

The Slider

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab