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Magenta Cast over image when using EDR


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#1 oscar jimenez

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:26 PM

Hello,

We have a Miro LC320S. When trying to use the EDR function on the camera, it generates a magenta pink cast over image, regardless CSR or be Black Ref activated at all the times, any solutions to this? it happens indoors or outdoors, so Ive never been able to use EDR for anything actually, As well camera settings are master gamma 1.6 ( for noise reduction ), contrast 0, gain 0, bright 0.  Matrix is turned to off at all the times, pedestal/master black to 0.  Many thanks for any input.

After activating EDR I have done as well CSR and White balance, just to play safe, and again its the same.

Best,

Oscar Jimenez
Voltage Productions, Panama, Central America.
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#2 oscar jimenez

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 08:25 AM

 Mr. Mitch Gross, Phantom Specialist, any clues?


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#3 Tim Tyler

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 10:54 AM

Here is a reply I received from Vision Research:

EDR is an exclusive Phantom technique to do a double exposure, frame by frame. The idea is to use EDR (enhanced dynamic range) to re-expose the saturated pixels to shorter exposure times to reduce the number of over exposed pixels, effectively increasing your dynamic range. 

When using EDR however, you must be careful of the "Magenta" that does appear. If you are using EDR with less than 1/3 the original exposure time, you can get this Magenta. To avoid this:

  1. Do not use EDR always, only when you expect to get oversaturated pixels (reflections in bright sunlight, explosions, etc...
     
  2. When using EDR, use it at just under 50% of the original exposure time. Example, if your main exposure time is set at one millisecond, use an EDR time of no more than 40% of the original, or in this case, 400 microseconds

The Magenta is unavoidable when using very short EDR times, it is not a failure of the camera. you CAN however, use the white balance AGAIN after you notice the Magenta, and should be able to nearly erase it.

 

Suggested Tutorials http://www.visionres...port/Tutorials/


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#4 oscar jimenez

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 01:42 PM

Many thanks, will go tru it once over again. But many thanks indeed!

best

Oscar


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