Jump to content


Photo

Menance arm/boom arm setup


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 andrew ward

andrew ward
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 December 2013 - 08:18 PM

Ima buy a Modern Studio menace arm kit.
I want to use a 12by pole and also maybe have 2x6by poles with a joiner.
Im wondering how the balance works. With a straight 12ft pole would you put 2ft behind the head and 10ft in front?
Is there a standard ratio to how much pole is in front of or behind the stand?

Also, you couldnt reasonably go much longer than 12by total pole with joiners could you?
Its probably just for hanging small hairlights so im wondering if its worth trying like 3x6by poles with 2 joiners or if it gets unsafe.

Yes i know menace arms are dangerous and only trained grips should be doing them.

Any advice welcome. Thanks!!
  • 0

#2 Kurtis Myers

Kurtis Myers

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Grip
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 December 2013 - 12:49 PM

It sort of varies from set up to set up depending on which stand you use, how long your boom is, and what you're putting on the end of it.

 

Here's a photo of one. http://b.vimeocdn.co...9247737_640.jpg

 

You need to balance the load of the light on your boom end with shot bags on the other end. So, if your light is sticking 10 feet out, and you only have 2 feet on the back end, then you're going to need more counterweight than if you gave yourself 3 feet on the back end instead. Keep in mind that there are weight limits on the stands. A mambo combo has a limit of around 90 pounds. You could go over 12 feet, so long as the maximum weight limit isn't exceeded. I recently built a menace arm with a pretty hefty light on the end (15-20lbs). It only extended about  8 or 9 feet out, but I didn't want to go any further with it than that. Once it starts getting that heavy, it's a pain to raise it up in the air. You might want to get a ladder or two and raise it first and then start securing it and adding your weight and light if it's going to be too heavy to raise afterwards.

 

Bag the stand down well, obviously, and throw a strap from the back end to the bottom of the riser housing to keep it safe from tipping once it's in the air. You'll want another guy to help.


  • 0

#3 andrew ward

andrew ward
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 December 2013 - 07:49 AM

Thanks.
  • 0

#4 Hugo Roy

Hugo Roy

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Montreal

Posted 16 January 2014 - 09:22 PM

My key grip often use a 5 sections Avenger stand. In a studio or outside. Easier to raise the rig. We often do a 14' extension with a 20' pipe. So you have 6' on the back.
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

CineLab

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Technodolly

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

CineTape

CineLab