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Bolex Video Taps in the UK


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#1 James R Blann

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:25 AM

Hi all,

 

I'm shooting a pixelation project on 16mm in the next few weeks and am after a modified Bolex with some kind of videotap in order to do a bit of an onion skin for the animation. I've seen pictures and read that they exist but I suspect it's more of an enthusiast thing than a standard. I've been around the major rentals without much luck. We're shooting in London so if anyone can be of assistance around that area then that'd be great. Our backup is an SR3 with an intervalometer, but i'd really like to shoot standard 16 and use the Bolex lenses that I have.

 

Also if anyone has any advice on the possible pitfalls of shooting on either the SR3/intervalometer or Bolex for stop frame, your input could be invaluable! We're mainly doing a 2 meter track in as pixilation happens, nothing too tricky.

 

Thanks,

 

James


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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 11:29 AM

What's an onion skin?


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#3 James R Blann

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 12:30 PM

Wikipedia says it best;

 

Onion skinning is a 2D computer graphics term for a technique used in creating animated cartoons and editing movies to see several frames at once. This way, the animator or editor can make decisions on how to create or change an image based on the previous image in the sequence.

In traditional cartoon animation, the individual frames of a movie were initially drawn on thin onionskin paper over a light source. The animators (mostlyinbetweeners) would put the previous and next drawings exactly beneath the working drawing, so that they could draw the 'in between' to give a smooth motion.

In computer software, this effect is achieved by making frames translucent and projecting them on top of each other.

This effect can also be used to create motion blurs, as seen in The Matrix when characters dodge bullets.


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#4 Lance Soltys

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 02:47 PM

One benefit of the SR3 is that it is pin registered.  I've shot quite a bit of stop-motion with a Bolex and frame alignment can slip, especially in temperature extremes.

 

As far as a video tap, would attaching some type of lipstick cam (or really any small video camera) next to it be close enough to do your onion skin?  Are you planning on using Dragonframe, or a Lunchbox or anything?  I know of some animators that would bet these little chip cameras, it was just a tiny lens attached to a printed circuit board (that was like 1" square) and they use that on DSLR's to feed in to Dragonframe to use as a guide.  Something like that might work going through the Bolex finder, though I've never tried it.


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rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly