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Warming filters for digital?


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#1 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:22 AM

Hi Guys,

 

I'm looking to expand my filtration options so I have a little more to play with image-wise. As much as I like the cool, contrasty look I get from my Zeiss CP.2s I'd like to try and wrangle some different looks out of them so I was thinking of shooting with some Warm Black Promist filters (1/8 and 1/4).

 

Is anyone familiar with the Warm BPMs? I know and love my regular BPMs, so I'm familiar with the diffusion characteristics of them, but I'd love to get people's opinions on what the warming element does to them. I'm also considering mixing them with low-cons to pull some of the punchiness out of the Zeisses.

 

Other options are tobacco and antique suede, and I'd love to hear people's thoughts on them as well.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark


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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 04:40 AM

I used to use 1/8 and 1/4 promists on the Betacam format cameras, but I tend to dig into the menus more these days. You could do some initial tests by adjusting or fooling the white balance. 


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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 05:09 AM

I use WBPMs often on digital cameras and I just personally like the look. It's pretty subtle, the warming, depending on what you're shooting, and can get to be a bit boring at times. I suppose, however, you could get the same effect with a coral and a BPM, or just rent a set to audition them to your tastes before buying them. I normally stick to 1/8 and 1/4 as well.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:02 PM

Considering the warming element in a Warm ProMist and whatnot is an 812 filter, which is pretty pale, you can easily add that sort of warmth by adjusting the color temperature of the camera, so I don't see the need for pale warming filters in digital, especially not a separate one.  I'd make two exceptions: one would be the warm versions of diffusion filters that use warm specks or dots, not overall warmth, like a Bronze GlimmerGlass or Gold Diffusion-FX, where the black specks are replaced by gold ones, that may have a subtle effect on the shadows versus the highlights, though probably again you could just get the same warmth more or less by changing the color temp in camera… the second exception would be a heavy warming effect like from a Chocolate or Sepia, where you really are trying to cancel a lot of other wavelengths.

 

But for your typical extra warmth like from an 812 or 1/8 Coral, etc. it is too easy to just set your camera at 3700K instead of 3200K in tungsten light, or 7000K instead of 5600K outdoors. Plus most digital cameras get a cleaner blue channel the more your raise the color temp setting rather than add warming filters and shoot at lower color temp settings (for example, the blue channel would be cleaner by switching from 3200K to 3700K to get warmth rather than leaving it as 3200K and putting a 1/4 Coral on the camera.)


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#5 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 10:30 AM

Hmm... all good points. Thanks guys. I'll try some experiments with slightly warmer WB for starters.

 

Cheers


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