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Top Light and shadows


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#1 Alexandre de Tolan

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 08:36 PM

First of all, this is my first post and I don't want to go by without congratulate all participants on this forum for their contribution to this highly educational source of information. I've been a reader for quite a while now and finally toke the step forward to register and participate.

 

To the point. My first question:

 

Indoor top ambient light, usually diffused through muslim is a common technique to raise light levels. Even more adequate if we have to justify an overhead light source (something like a chandelier over a dinning table for instance). Nonetheless one thing keeps striking me

 

I've studied some scenes where top light is clearly used on those situations and none of them shows evident chandelier shadows on the table top or on the actors, which I find odd since it were plain natural for the top light above the chandeliers to project some shadows bellow, even with diffused light (or so I think).

 

Can someone share some thoughts on this? 


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#2 Giray Izcan

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 04:25 AM

You can place your top light source off to the side of a chandelier, not directly above it.
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#3 Alexandre de Tolan

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 10:59 AM

You can place your top light source off to the side of a chandelier, not directly above it.

 

I believe that that would only cast the shadows to the sides instead of casting them down. Right? 


Edited by Alexandre de Tolan, 01 January 2014 - 10:59 AM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 12:13 PM

Usually the light from the chandelier itself fills in any shadows from a soft box light above it, plus most tables are cluttered with objects that break up any unevenness in the light falling on the surface.


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#5 Alexandre de Tolan

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 12:43 PM

Usually the light from the chandelier itself fills in any shadows from a soft box light above it, plus most tables are cluttered with objects that break up any unevenness in the light falling on the surface.

 

Makes sense. Thanks David.


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