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Making The Shining


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#1 Tim Tyler

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 02:05 PM

In 1980, Stanley Kubrick shot The Shining, the classic horror film based on Stephen Kings novel. During production, the director allowed his daughter Vivian, then 17 years old, to shoot a documentary called Making The Shining, which lets you spend 33 minutes being a fly on the wall. The film originally aired on the BBC and gave British audiences the chance to see Jack Nicholson revving himself up to act, and Shelley Duvall collapsing in the hallway from stress and fatigue. Minutes later, we watch Mr. Kubrick exert some directorial force on the actress, and we understand her predicament all the more.

http://www.dailymoti...ning_shortfilms
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#2 Freya Black

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:13 PM

Thanks for that Tim. 

 

Here are the people involved talking about the making of the Shining:

 


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#3 Richard Boddington

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 07:18 PM

Holy cow, the Winter Maze was a set? Totally fooled me.  There is no fog coming out of the actors mouths as they breathe, I guess I didn't really key into that the first time.

 

If this movie was shot in Canada, the producer would of said.....you want to build a set on a sound stage with fake snow? In Canada?

 

R,


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#4 John Holland

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 02:13 PM

Fake snow that then caught fire and burnt down the biggest stage at Elstree ! George Lucas was was waiting to move in to start " The Empire Strikes Back " To be fair it was rebuilt quickly then 10 years down the line where it stood is a Tesco Supermarket {Shame }
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#5 Richard Boddington

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 02:28 PM

Really? Fascinating.  I wonder what material the snow was made of then? You'd think they'd use a material that could not burn?

 

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#6 Freya Black

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 03:01 PM

I understood that they were using mountains of salt as snow?

 

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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 04:19 PM

Boxes, another great documentary.

 


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#8 John Holland

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 04:42 AM

There was a lot of polystyrene on the stage which caught fire and yes salt was also used .
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#9 Freya Black

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 05:01 AM

There was a lot of polystyrene on the stage which caught fire and yes salt was also used .

 

Ah that explains it!

I think salt is also quite electrically conductive especially if there is any damp around so it may have been an especially bad combination! What do people use for safe snow these days?

 

You weren't actually there were you John? Just wondering! ;)

 

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#10 John Holland

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 01:08 PM

No but we were waiting to start on " Empire "
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#11 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 03:09 PM

You worked on "Empire" John ?


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#12 Tim Tyler

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:49 PM

I was on some exterior fake snow sets in the late 80's and the snow was a paper product.

 

http://www.excelfibr...oducts/snowcel/

 

"This paper SnowCel snow is very stable and weatherproof and used for more than a week. It is good for work on location in its chemical free form and for studio work in its class 1 fire resistant version."

 

 I wonder what material the snow was made of then? 


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#13 Freya Black

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 04:00 AM

You worked on "Empire" John ?

 

He did! He also worked on a ton of other amazing movies. Whenever I hear of a classic movie shot in Britain I'm wondering if John worked on it! ;)

 

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#14 Freya Black

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 04:44 AM

So the documentary by Vivian shows a piece of equipment that looks like 2 vinten pedestals welded togther with a tiny crane on the front. What is this thing? It looks very practical... no need to lay track presumably. Are there any obvious disadvantages to it? I've never seen one of these being used before. Is it something that went out of fashion?

 

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#15 Freya Black

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 05:31 AM

Also check out this contraption on the side of the stairs. It appears to have wheels on the bottom and to support 2 cameras at once? It looks like the guy at the bottom might push it up the stairs! Is this something recognisable or something they cobbled together on set?

 

elite-daily-the-shining-behind-the-scene

 

 

Freya


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#16 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 11:22 AM

It looks rather like a multi camera set up on the stairs using a special rig because of the lack of space..


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#17 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 12:39 PM

Maybe Garret had gone home by then? Seems an elaborate compromise when you have a steadicam on the set!

I'm guessing he wanted two focal lengths in one pass.


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#18 Freya Black

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 01:25 PM

Maybe Garret had gone home by then? Seems an elaborate compromise when you have a steadicam on the set!

I'm guessing he wanted two focal lengths in one pass.

 

Maybe but steadicam does look quite different to track. I know that Stanley was disappointed that they couldn't get the steadicam shot working to follow the go-cart around the hotel. They solved the problem by using steadicam in a wheelchair but I imagine it wouldn't look quite the same. In fact I would imagine it would look better in a way as the go-cart runs on wheels too but I'm not sure what Stanley had in mind.

 

This strange contraption looks like it might even use the hand rail as track. I'm not sure what the wheel on the stairs does however, as obviously stairs aren't a flat surface but maybe they had some kind of surface on the stairs at the side for the wheels to run on too.

 

Looks like they must have spent some time working it all out and making it.

 

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#19 Freya Black

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 01:29 PM

It looks rather like a multi camera set up on the stairs using a special rig because of the lack of space..

 

Yes but I'm convinced this thing tracks up the staircase on account of the 2 wheels and the triangle that sticks out for the guy to push it up. I would also assume that a fixed rig would actually be clamped to the handrail or something.

 

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#20 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 01:48 PM

The camera does move in that sequence IIRC.

Presumably the steadicam was not precise enough.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 09 January 2014 - 01:48 PM.

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