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What camera to choose?


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#1 Haley Shook

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:07 PM

So I recently got a Canon Rebel T4i and I like it but I wasn't sure if it was the best tool for both picture and video. O was wondering if anyone had experience with these cameras or has any better suggestions. I was thinking of taking this camera webinar with the guy from planet5D https://www.stage32....a-for-Your-Film", but I would also love to get your thoughts? Thanks :]


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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:33 PM

The camera you have is a great learning tool. Fantastic work has been done on it. Eventually you will start to notice its shortcomings, but I can't imagine that someone at undergrad level would need anything better in order to learn a lot.

 

The seminar isn't incredibly expensive so you may as well, but personally I'd just ensure that you shoot with it a lot. And edit, and perhaps grade, the results; that's very important. It's easy to wander around pointing it at things, but until you actually try to achieve a sequence that it's actually possible to edit we've really nothing to talk about. The people who get good at this stuff shoot a lot, and edit the results.

 

So go and shoot something, and post it here and we'll talk about it.

 

P


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#3 joshua gallegos

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 12:36 PM

I own the t4i (canon650D), it's a decent camera for any entry level filmmaker, it gets noisy when you rate it at 800 ASA, so I would use it with fast prime lenses - especially if you're filming at night, I wouldn't use the kit lens that comes with the camera,, but I got better results when I used it at 400ASA. I'd also get an external monitor as the small flip screen can be quite deceiving, you have to look more at the histogram to make sure you don't lose detail in the shadows (when filming at night).

 

As for taking photos, the viewfinder is very small and inadequate, so you have to rely on the screen to take pictures. I think a 5D Mark II or 7D would give you better results as you can manipulate ASA and color temperature without having to white balance. 

 

That being said, any camera is a storytelling tool, so in a way it's irrelevant - if you can't tell a story with one of these little things, then you won't be able to do any better with a RED or Alexa. 


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#4 Jeremy Parsons

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:57 AM

Save your money and skip the webinar. You already have the camera and the camera you have is great for learning on. You don't need anything fancy or expensive right now.

 

Like Phil and Josh said, the camera has its limitations despite still being able to capture a great image for that you paid for. You'll grow to understand the limitations of the DSLRs. As a learning tool they are really great. 

 

I highly recommend experimenting with lenses and filters you can check out from school or any Calumet.

 

Download Magic lantern. It's a free third-party firmware overlay that gives you some added functionality to the camera. I use on my 60D for two things: Focus Peaking - tells you what is sharp focus - which is crucial for shooting a 35mm-ish format. Frame rate override lets you dial any frame rate from <1fps - 60fps instead of only 24-30-60 (if T4i even does 60). If you want anything over 30, you'll need to drop to 720p. 

 

Also, download DaVinci Resolve Lite. It's free and VERY powerful color correction software. You'll learn how much you can grade DSLR footage in post, which isn't much compared to other cameras.


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#5 David Peterson

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 03:19 AM

The T4i is a bit of a rubbish camera, all of Canon's APS-C DSLRs are, because Canon has utterly stalled on pushing forward its sensor tech in this area.

But that doesn't matter.... you can still do amazing things with it! Because the camera matter less than you think. In rough order of priority it is: content, light, lenses, camera. (camera is last!)

Check out what nice stuff this guy has shot with a T2i:
http://www.eoshd.com...5-year-old-dslr

 

So I say just get together with like minded folks and get out there and start shooting! :-D

 

There are heaps of free guides and youtube videos out there to watch. If you do spend any money, do it perhaps on some helpful books, like this one:

http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/187950541X

 

Edit: oh, and what Jeremy Parsons said x10. :) Do that too!


Edited by David Peterson, 20 July 2014 - 03:21 AM.

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#6 Soufian Ratib

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 02:44 PM

Nikon D800 would be the way to go as it provides a clean HDMi out and fully uncompressed in 10 bits if hooked up to an external recorder. On top of that, Timelapse is built in so no need to buy an extra piece of equipement.


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