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reflecta Super 8 Scanner


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#1 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:06 AM

https://reflecta.de/...rhaeltlich.html


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#2 Geoff Howell

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:47 AM

looks interesting, a fair bit cheaper than Tobin and Moviestuf too.

 

I wonder if it's a 100% new build or a refit of a 30+ yr old projector

 


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#3 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 10:03 AM

I wonder if it's a 100% new build or a refit of a 30+ yr old projector

 

I guess that a 100% new build in China is cheaper than actually refitting any older projector (especially when you expect to sell a large number of these devices)


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#4 Zac Fettig

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:30 AM

It probably is cheaper to build one from scratch in production, but it sure does look like a projector refit. Which is probably cheaper for low volume runs.


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#5 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 04:19 PM

 

I guess that a 100% new build in China is cheaper than actually refitting any older projector (especially when you expect to sell a large number of these devices)

 

 

I guess that a 100% new build in China is cheaper than actually refitting any older projector (especially when you expect to sell a large number of these devices)

Indeed, it is newly manufactured. Look close at the images.


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#6 Geoff Howell

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 06:46 PM

more info here

apparently it captures at just under 7000dpi.

hopefully there will be some demos soon


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#7 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:42 PM

6k resolution at 9 fps? I'd love to see samples. I wonder what kind of camera they're using.
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#8 David Cunningham

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:46 PM

If it scans at 7000 dpi and a super 8mm frame is less than 0.275 inches that means it scan the frame at just about 1920 lines.... Also known as HD 1929x1080. Best case it might be 2K but that would definitely not be 6k.
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#9 David Cunningham

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:50 PM

If it's a 14MP camera in a 16x9 format then it's scanning at about 4K. I'm very confused by the numbers presented.
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#10 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:58 PM

If it's a 14MP camera in a 16x9 format then it's scanning at about 4K. I'm very confused by the numbers presented.

Same here. 4K is about 8.3MP?


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#11 David Cunningham

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 08:40 AM

4k 16x9 is 3840x2160 and thus about 8.3MP

4k scanning of a full frame at 4x3 is 4096x3112 which is almost 12.8 megapixel.

6k wide sensors at 6114x3160... 19.5 megapixel

6k at 4x3 would be 6144x4620... 28 megapixel

So, this think is definitely not 6k.

If this thing can scan at 7000 dpi then that's only 1610x1050 on a standard 4x3 super 8 frame. That's not even HD.

So. All these numbers leave me head scratching.
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#12 David Cunningham

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 08:57 AM

So, it says it does 1920x1080 output from a standard Super 8 frame.  So, assuming the 1080 height and a 1436 width in a 4x3 sensor that would be only a 1.5 MP camera.    If it's 1920 wide sensor cropped to 1436, it would be 2MP.

 

So, the 7000 DPI starts to make sense as that would be 1610x1050... very close to 1436x1080.


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#13 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 10:37 AM

You're right, it says dpi but I read pixels. Tricky.
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#14 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 11:44 AM

BTW: Some texts by reflecta sound like two frames get captured at once: "Scanning Time: 5,0 seconds / 2 pictures (about 2 Std. 46 min for15m Super 8 FilmReel)" (BTW: Std. = Stunden = hours)

(Source: https://reflecta.de/...er-englisch.pdf )

As a 15m-reel normally holds 50ft of film (=3600 frames), 5s per 3 frames would result in 2h 30min...


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#15 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 12:32 PM

Looks like it will only handle reversal, but for it's intended market i'd say it's about time something like this has come along. The way digital video is evolving, I don't see why we need a $100K plus option to subsidize the mechanical and software aspects of scanning film. I keep thinking or stating that a film scanner revolution is in the works. This is most likely a fairly decent but consumer level scanner for home movies. But I bet it won't be long until Blackmagic Design unveils an affordable scanner designed for film makers.


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#16 Zac Fettig

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 12:39 PM

Looks like it will only handle reversal, but for it's intended market i'd say it's about time something like this has come along. The way digital video is evolving, I don't see why we need a $100K plus option to subsidize the mechanical and software aspects of scanning film. I keep thinking or stating that a film scanner revolution is in the works. This is most likely a fairly decent but consumer level scanner for home movies. But I bet it won't be long until Blackmagic Design unveils an affordable scanner designed for film makers.

 

You'd think Kodak would have realized by now it is in their best interest to build some low cost, reasonable quality digital acquisition devices for film. Before the last viable part of their business goes the way of the Dodo bird.

 

You'd think....


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#17 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 01:04 PM

Here's my take on this: it's essentially a very slow film chain, and correct me if I'm wrong, but it looks to be sprocketed.

 

Since we got our scanstation a few months ago, we've probably put about 50,000 feet of Super8 and Regular 8 film through it. I'd say less than half of that would have gone through a projector without problems, due to shrinkage, perf damage, splices made with athletic tape (seriously), etc. We're talking about films going back as as far as the late 1940s (for R8). But even some of the Super8 has been in such rough shape that I'd be surprised if it could actually make it through something like this, with a sprocket-based transport.

 

One client brought in Super 8 Reversal that he shot less than a year ago. His projector tore massive holes between each perf, and he couldn't get it to project anymore. We were able to scan it and get a decent result, but I seriously doubt any transport based on sprockets would have been able to do it because there was basically nothing left for it to grab onto.

 

Personally, (and I fully understand I'm biased here), I wouldn't put any of my own Super 8 through anything that's projector-like anymore. Even my own films from the early 90s are starting to show signs of shrinkage already, and I take good care of them.

 

-perry


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#18 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 01:12 PM

 

You'd think Kodak would have realized by now it is in their best interest to build some low cost, reasonable quality digital acquisition devices for film. Before the last viable part of their business goes the way of the Dodo bird.

 

You'd think....

Exactly, i've been wondering this for years! With digital imaging technology, software, and PC power these days, I see no reason why a really good scanner for S8/S16mm couldn't have been produced for the mountain of existing film, amateurs, film schools ect... for around $1K as opposed to $100K? This kind of digital/cost road block has been broken down everywhere else except for film. But maybe now is the time where that will finally change? Hope it's not too late and digital technology will help stabilize the gap for those who choose film, old or new.


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#19 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 03:09 PM

Blackmagic may or may not be working on such a device. Until then, theres always the diy route. I would like to build a sprocketless multi-gauge scanner based on the stepper motor/arduino stuff I've learned so far. The Muller HM has always been inspirational to me. Sort of a pipe dream though...
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#20 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 03:17 PM

I don't think a scanner for $1k will be much good, too many compromises in sensor, optics and being built around an old projector mechanism is not the best idea for all of the reasons others have already stated. That said I think we are already seeing a drop in pricing of scans and that will continue.

 

-Rob-


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