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#1 Cole Schlesinger

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:35 PM

Hello I am shooting a sketch that is set in the early morning during breakfast. I have 2 problems, the room is to big to look like a dinning room. And the walls surrounding are all white. I want to make the walls less dull what are some lighting techniques I could use to make them more exiting? And is there a way to make the room look smaller ? Thanks for the help
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#2 Cole Schlesinger

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:39 PM

Also any recommended color schemes for early morning look. I am thinking blue and orange. Orange being the praminate color.
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#3 Will Barber

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:50 PM

Well, a big room helps you with the fact that you can pull away from the walls so you aren't casting shadows, and you can more easily keep light off the walls. One solution to the white walls is to get some wallpaper, and adhere it temporarily to the walls as flat as possible, something I recommend doing the day before the shoot, not the morning of. That also gives you the opportunity to create your color scheme in the environment, rather than just in the lighting.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:51 PM

Maybe push the table nearer to the window and just frame the window wall and the table in the wide shot, if a profile angle, and then in the coverage looking at a right angle to the window wall, bring the table closer to another wall to close down the space (though that might create more work if the window no longer works as the place where the light is coming from.)

 

Best thing would be to paint the walls.  Truth is, the best thing would be to find a better location that has darker walls and is closer to the right size.


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#5 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:54 PM

You can not win with white walls. They're like kryptonite for cinematography. Yet, we find ourselves in ugly white rooms constantly. It's merciless.


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#6 Will Barber

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:13 PM

You can not win with white walls. They're like kryptonite for cinematography. Yet, we find ourselves in ugly white rooms constantly. It's merciless.

Because they're good for lighting as long as it's NOT movies. Just like 4400K fluorescents and mixed color temperatures. I don't get why they'd use those fluorescents, 5600K is much more pleasing to the eye. Green lights make me feel weird.


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#7 Cole Schlesinger

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 08:42 PM

Maybe push the table nearer to the window and just frame the window wall and the table in the wide shot, if a profile angle, and then in the coverage looking at a right angle to the window wall, bring the table closer to another wall to close down the space (though that might create more work if the window no longer works as the place where the light is coming from.)
 
Best thing would be to paint the walls.  Truth is, the best thing would be to find a better location that has darker walls and is closer to the right size.


I want to find a place but my problem is I am currently in Japan and location scouting is very limited do to a strong language barrier. I may get fake wall paper and paste it over the whites. Thanks for the help.
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#8 Greenlandzone

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 12:48 AM

Thanks. I was searching the same information since many months. Thanks for your hard work.
 

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#9 Shimon Machida

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 01:11 PM

There's a lot to play around with an early morning set up. The sun is at an unusual position so you'll get away with unique shadows to fill that white wall. 

If you want to make your room look more compact, I suggest using tighter lenses (normal and up), it'll help create depth and that'll help manipulate space easier.  

 

Shaping light and creating interesting shadows is one thing, but it'll help a lot if you talk to your art department. 

I always work closely with art directors and set decorator. They'll be happy to add more detail to the frame to make it work for the picture, even something as small as a plant or a foldable table. After all, a white wall is just a white all regardless of how you light it.


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#10 Paul Watt

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 01:29 PM

Would Japanese style wall dividers help?  If you placed them in a straight line you might be able to bring one wall, while adding texture and colour.  If you could bring in your ceiling by placing either hanging lights or a fan into the frame it would compact the scene a bit.  Or fill the white space with artwork, some furniture, maybe a tall desk or whatever.  


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