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Recommended fluorescents for cyan colour cast


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#1 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 12:39 PM

I'm looking for recommendations for any brand of fluorescent tube that will give me a nasty cyan/green colour cast. I'm assuming cheap cool white tubes with a poor CRI will be a good place to start but if anyone has specific model/brand recommendations I'd love to hear them. All the tubes will be in shot so I can't use Kinos w/gel which is what I'd normally do! I'm shooting tungsten stock btw.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 12:42 PM

I'd go by price -- if someone is selling Cool Whites for a dollar a tube, they are probably fairly greenish.


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#3 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 01:04 PM

Thanks David - I'm presuming cool whites are approx 4000 kelvin? So in an ideal world if I could find cheap daylight tubes with a low CRI I'd get a colder cast with a green spike too?
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 01:23 PM

I'm on the point of replacing 16 tubes with better ones, but they're warmish and go sickly yellow, not blue, and they probably aren't worth shipping.

 

You might try looking for things advertised as "halophosphate." This is the fluorescent tube equivalent of "Auto Stop" on a cassette deck, when they've got literally no features to shout about. All modern fluorescent tubes are halophosphate*, and the only reason anyone would shout about it is if it wasn't triphosphor. And you don't want triphosphor, because the purpose of triphosphor technology, which uses RGB phosphor blends, is to have better colour rendering than halophosphate, which tries to make white light with simpler physics.

 

So, that may help. But basically, get cheap cool white ones with a CRI below 75, they're going to be cyan as hell.

 

P

 

* Edit - actually I was wrong, this isn't quite true, but the rest of it stands.


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#5 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 01:32 PM

Great thanks phil
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 01:41 PM

To wit, just so we can see what we're on about...

 

Cool white (this is probably a dual phosphor tube with reasonable performance for everyday use, but not a precision device):

640px-Fluorescent_lighting_spectrum_peak

 

Deeply nasty halophosphate junk (warm white, this one, hence the big peak in the yellow)

 

640px-Spectrum_of_halophosphate_type_flu

 

Philips "natural sunshine", presumably triphosphor:

 

640px-Spectra-Philips_32T8_natural_sunsh


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#7 Matthew Parnell

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 05:12 PM

What's stopping you from going a high quality tube such as a Phillips TLD-950 or TLD-930 and gelling it?

At least then you would have half a chance to match any film lights to the cyan colour.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

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Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Abel Cine