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Degree Essay Question - Please Help


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#1 George Morris

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 09:41 AM

Greetings fellow cinematographers 

I am a degree student studying Digital Film Production at Ravensbourne in London. I'm currently writing a essay on the development of present and future technologies in film create an impact on cinematography?
 

I understand this is a bit of a broad question to answer, but I am new to the technological aspects of cinematography and still looking for a specific way in writing about this area of cinematography. If you would be able to talk about any recent or latest experiences in any jobs or sets that featured a significant level of technological involvement and how that affected your shoot for better or worse, that would be most helpful!

If not could you please recommend some articles or books you may know that can help me gain a better insight into this field.

Any and all help would be greatly appreciated!!

 

 


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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 04:17 PM

Were I you, and granted the wording of that question is almost non-sensical- I would read up and look into the making of Gravity and Life of Pi as case studies for the integration of very technological things to cinematography.


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#3 George Morris

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 06:14 PM

Yeah my grammar isn't exactly my strongest area!

Cheers anyway boyo!


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#4 Freya Black

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:57 AM

"the development of present and future technologies in film create an impact on cinematography?"

 

I was trying to come up with something seemingly witty about time travel and future technologies but right now my sense of humor seems to be unappreciated! ;)

 

In any case I would avoid talking about future technologies if you can for obvious reasons.

You might want to phrase it more like "how new technologies are shaping the future and their impact on cinematography." or something in that vein. Plant it firmly in the present basically, with a nod to how present events might shape the future. (or for that matter maybe just leave out the future altogether! It's up to you.)

 

You probably don't want to limit yourself to film either given that a lot of the new stuff seems to be in realm of video and digital technology although a lot of the digital stuff affects people working with celluloid as much as on modern video cameras.

 

I know how difficult it is when they make you write your own questions! It's easy to get yourself in a knot with it all!

They will probably let you change it to reflect what you actually intended tho I imagine.

 

Freya


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#5 Freya Black

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 07:00 AM

I guess I missed my opportunity to link to this:

 


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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:39 AM

At the camera end there's not much difference, you're just unloading data as against film. The DP needs to test the characteristics of the sensor/camera setup/codec combination just as they did a film.stock. It's the worksflows that have changed and the politics of the grading process have shifted, perhaps not to the DP's advantage. .


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#7 Freya Black

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 09:18 AM

At the camera end there's not much difference, you're just unloading data as against film. The DP needs to test the characteristics of the sensor/camera setup/codec combination just as they did a film.stock. It's the worksflows that have changed and the politics of the grading process have shifted, perhaps not to the DP's advantage. .

 

While that is all true, I think it's changed a lot at the camera end, it's just been a gradual thing. Certainly there is a big thing these days to want to see exactly what it is going to look like on set and a push to try and get it to look as much on set as it will when finished. Also it seems like there are more and more different scopes and video metering options turning up.

 

I also think that being shown a representation of what the sensor is seeing removes some amount of imagination from the process and that people are more likely to settle for what is good enough at an earlier point, rather than pushing for the best that they can, whether they are aware they are doing that or not! A lot of people are doing more takes because it is easier to do so with video cameras. Things like slow motion are becoming more and more not a big deal as there is often no extra cost on video cameras that support high frame rates. Different lenses are becoming more of a thing for people. Camera are also becoming smaller and lighter etc etc.

 

Also basically as television and cinema become the same thing, working practices are going in both directions with television having more cinematic imagery and cinema being more influenced by television working practices. A merging is taking place.

 

Freya


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#8 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 10:45 AM

The most noticeable addition to the camera crew is the DIT. There has been the introduction of LUT and the use of RAW and log, how many scopes you see on a set can vary, depending on the nature of the production. Some DPs just use the histogram or other exposure tools in the camera, while others like looking at a waveform monitor and some do rely on the DIT to cover that, while using their exposure meter. There has been some cross over of television technology, although video assists have been around for sometime, so the video village concept isn't that new. It's what happens after it leaves the set that has changed a lot more. On the set I suspect a 1960s DP could more or less understand what;'s going on, it's afterwards where whole new workflows have been introduced.

 

The reduction in camera cost has been been the most noticeable thing, although high end cameras aren't cheap and their glass seems to become evermore expensive.     


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Tai Audio

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The Slider

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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CineLab

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

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