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Gripping: Where on earth do I start?

grip start experience

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#1 Eddie Cole

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 05:59 PM

Hi, Im 18 currently studying network and systems but I love film and all the behind the scenes and dont want to sit behind a desk for the rest of my life.
I live inbetween leeds and manchester and have absolutly no idea where to get started, I dont finish till early june but I'd love to start getting experience on set. I found a lvl 2 and lvl 3 nvq specifically in gripping but I have to have worked as a grip for two years before being able to apply (seems a bit backwards to me? )

Where do I start?

Just to note; I could move to london and use my trust fund to get me off the ground to do what I would absolufly love too.

Thanks in advance :)
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:08 PM

Well given you're propensity for computer, perhaps DIT work? It's a growing field in film and gets you kinda both in the camera department, and the post department-- but this all depends on what you want to do in the end. I would say if you're goal is directing, then you just have to direct.


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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:15 PM

You could keep an eye on this http://www.craftandt...ual-industries/

 

There are also other trainee schemes on that site, I suspect you need to do something that makes to stand out from the crowd in getting a position.


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#4 Eddie Cole

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:16 PM

Ahh I should of specified, My goal is to become just a straight up grip. Maybe a dolly grip later on down the line, I love doing manual labour which is why the change of heart from IT.
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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 07:46 AM

In the UK grips don't set flags etc, they operate camera dollies. and cranes, lay tracks, set up tripods and rig camera mounts, the manual labour part is around that area. Here the electricians rig the flags and other stuff associated with the lighting.


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#6 Eddie Cole

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 08:20 AM

In the UK grips don't set flags etc, they operate camera dollies. and cranes, lay tracks, set up tripods and rig camera mounts, the manual labour part is around that area. Here the electricians rig the flags and other stuff associated with the lighting.

 

Yeah I know, Thats why Im so interested in it because getting to work with all the dollys/cranes ect is exactly what I want to do.


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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 08:40 AM

Check out here: http://www.gripsbranch.org.uk/

 

Making contacts is usually the best starting point, keeping in touch for as long as it takes, so they know who you are. Then read all you can on the subject and help out on any local no budget or student films for experience.


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#8 Eddie Cole

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 08:50 AM

Check out here: http://www.gripsbranch.org.uk/

 

Making contacts is usually the best starting point, keeping in touch for as long as it takes, so they know who you are. Then read all you can on the subject and help out on any local no budget or student films for experience.

 

 "To apply to take the qualification an individual must have been working professionally as a Grip or Crane Tech for a minimum of 2 years within the industry, and must supply a detailed CV plus references."

 

This the part I was talking about in the OP from that site, Im enquiring about the other one you linked though.


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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 09:23 AM

That's why you must establish contact with the grips first, the NVQ is finishing off the training, not the starting point. It could also be qualifying grips already working in the industry because H & S so important these days and employers want that certificate.


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#10 Freya Black

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:27 PM

 and employers want that certificate.

 

...I really doubt that!

 

Might help in a competitive situation I guess tho.

 

Freya


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#11 Freya Black

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:31 PM

Where do I start?

 

Maybe you could help out on some shoots at the Met while you are doing your studies.

Contact them and ask them if they could use some on set help! :)

 

You could even put up an ad offering to help.

They used to have a floor in H-block but it must be somewhere else now but if you can get into the Electric Press building, perhaps for a screening, you could put an ad on the notice board there.

 

Freya


Edited by Freya Black, 14 February 2014 - 03:31 PM.

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#12 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:32 PM

 

...I really doubt that!

 

Actually, the BBC demand that certificate, as do many insurers.


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#13 Freya Black

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:34 PM

Actually, the BBC demand that certificate, as do many insurers.

 

I hadn't thought of the BBC and that makes total sense!

Don't tend to think of the BBC as an employer, more as a bit of a club. :)

 

Freya


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#14 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:13 PM

A lot of freelance people are employed by the BBC and quite a few were trained by them. They can also be a bit surreal at times,

 

H & S is pretty big these days and risk assessments are a part of many productions. With certain jobs they want the paper work. 


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#15 Eddie Cole

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:32 PM

Yeah youve said this several times, The only problem is, I cant get the NVQ's until I have worked under 6 key grips in at least two years, Thats where im lost :(


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#16 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:42 PM

Yeah youve said this several times, 

Brian has explained this already. You need to contact the grips branch at BECTU, get some names and contact them, see if they are looking for trainees.

 

For instance, Grip Services in Bristol, who provide grips for Casualty, Dr.Who, Sherlock and most other productions at BBC Wales, often take on trainees. In fact, two of the grips I usually work with in the UK were trained there.


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#17 Eddie Cole

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:43 PM

Ahh I missed that sorry, I did send an email to grips branch, Ill get another email sent to the other places.


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#18 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:45 PM

It's difficult, but not impossible. You should do a bit of chasing after the training scheme they seem to be starting, get some idea of time scales, However, don't expect instant results, you need to convince them that you're serious and going to be around for more than just making a single call. 


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#19 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 07:06 PM

You need to contact the grips branch at BECTU, get some names and contact them, see if they are looking for trainees.


They really won't be. The film industry in this country is tiny and imploding rapidly.

To the wider issue, I can't shake the impression that the grip NVQ was created as an effort at job protectionism. Seriously: if you've been working as a grip for two years, you are a grip, to at least a minimum level. Perhaps it's because I've rarely met a grip I liked, but I can't help associating the term with a slightly overweight smoker who peppers every sentence with foul language and thinks that being gruff and taciturn is a sign of professionalism. Yes, there are very clever people out there building advanced and potentially dangerous rigs that require a lot of intelligence and planning, and they're all working for Jerry Bruckheimer. In the UK, most grips I've met are glorified box shifters with delusions of grandeur who have - on more than one occasion - moaned in my ear that levelling track is very skilled work. While I wrote software.

As a grip would say, for fuck's sake. You really want to be one of these people? They've deliberately created circumstances which make it clear they don't want you.

P
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#20 Freya Black

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 10:41 PM

A lot of freelance people are employed by the BBC and quite a few were trained by them. They can also be a bit surreal at times,

 

H & S is pretty big these days and risk assessments are a part of many productions. With certain jobs they want the paper work. 

 

Yes! I understand that the BBC were employing a growing number of people as freelance.

Not sure if that's been put a stop to or not recently.

 

Yup theres always been the box ticking side of things around, don't think that's anything new.

 

Freya


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Glidecam

The Slider

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Technodolly

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

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