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90s Talk Show Filming

90s talk-show 90s look

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#1 Edward Butt

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 04:34 PM

What was the common method for filming talk shows in the 90s? I came across some old 90s talk show clips on Youtube and realised they have a pretty distinctive look. 

 

Here's an example: 

 

I think this episode of The Jerry Springer Show was filmed in 1997. Isn't that when they started introducing digital and doing away with tape cameras?


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#2 Luke Hudson

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 03:04 PM

What probably creates the distinctive look is the type of camera rather than the recording medium.  The cameras were likely 2/3" 3 CCD studio cameras with no recording device fed into a video switcher for a live switch (and ISO or isolated record decks where each camera's feed was recorded separately to allow for mistakes in the live switch).  The cameras used on a talk show like Jerry Springer were similar to the ones used for the evening news and situation comedies that were not shot on film and also soap operas. You would have a hard time telling the difference between an analog and digital recording of the signal from those CCD cameras.


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#3 Edward Butt

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 04:01 PM

What probably creates the distinctive look is the type of camera rather than the recording medium.  The cameras were likely 2/3" 3 CCD studio cameras with no recording device fed into a video switcher for a live switch (and ISO or isolated record decks where each camera's feed was recorded separately to allow for mistakes in the live switch).  The cameras used on a talk show like Jerry Springer were similar to the ones used for the evening news and situation comedies that were not shot on film and also soap operas. You would have a hard time telling the difference between an analog and digital recording of the signal from those CCD cameras.

 

Thanks Luke.

 

Do you recall which cameras were most popular for such programmes between 95 and 2000?


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#4 Luke Hudson

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 09:08 PM

Sony and Ikegami were big players along with Panasonic, Hitachi, JVC, etc.  They all had different products which evolved over time---and the 3 CCD cameras (as opposed to the single chip consumer cameras) fell into two broad categories:  industrial and professional.  Industrial cameras were more for ENG work (electronic news gathering---with some type of recorder docked to the back) and smaller market and public access TV.  The professional line was more for national broadcasts of various kinds.  Ikegami really dominated the high-end professional line. 

 

Are you just curious about model numbers or are you trying to replicate the look for a project?


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#5 Mei Lewis

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:32 AM

The set design, fashions, hair styles, lighting, graphic design, 4:3 crop also have a big effect on it looking like that. Moreso than just the camera?


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