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Fomapan R100 Cinefilm Processing in U.S.

Fomapan R100 Super 8mm Foma

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#1 Larry S Moses

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 11:08 AM

Hello dear Fomapan Users,

After many years of dealing with U.S. labs that have provided mixed results in processing Fomapan R100,

there are two labs here in the U.S. that have mastered processing this film without pushing the exposure.

Spectra Film & Video in Burbank, CA    www.spectrafilmandvideo.com

dr-5 Chrome Lab in Denver, CO     www.dr5.com

Ive had both excellent result with these labs in processing Fomapan R100 film here in the U.S.

In Europe, Wittner Kinotechnik is the lab to use for Fomapan.

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#2 Michael Carter

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 08:33 PM

I can do it with the reversal kit from Freestyle Photo


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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 11:18 PM

Uh huh.

 

We develop allot of B&W Reversal, more than any lab in the world.

 

20,000ft in a day at times.

 

Foma has a much softer emulsion than Tri-X does, if you run it in the same time/temp as Tri-X the emulsion cooks off.

 

Spectra has called us in the past to ask how to deal with bleach issues, there is not a "Special mastery" of developing this stock.

 

Foma has to be run in special batches because the emulsion is not hard like Kodak or Orwo.

 

I see that dr5 charges $135 to develop an 100 ft roll of 16mm Foma, seems a bit expensive.

 

YMMV


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#4 Michael Carter

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 07:56 AM

I'm no trained lab tech. Just an old art teacher armature filmmaker. But, I have a darkroom, a UPB1A spiral tank. No problem reversing Foma R8mm except for the dirt on the film. Cleaning the film is something I have to overcome. I will be making prints and clean film is necessary.
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#5 Simon Wyss

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 08:57 AM

You wanted to say amateur, I presume, not armature.

 

Wipe the film with a damp viscose sponge cloth folded twice,

actually pull the film through it with almost no pressure.

 

The film wants to dry in a dust free environment. The best you can do is to avoid draught.

If you have to enhance drying, switch on a hair dryer pointed away from the film, let it blow

out for a couple seconds, then turn it slowly towards the drum. I speak of a drying drum.

Turn the drum a third revolution after five minutes. It’ll be dry after four such terms.

 

I think you are getting my hints.


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#6 Michael Carter

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 06:18 PM

It is hard to see the tiny letters, let alone to focus a Bolex H8-REX.
Emulsion I never touch when or after developing because it is so tacky when wet. However, I do gently run the film over a cloth to avoid drops on the back that can occur from drum ribs. After film is dry and while it is still loosely on the Morse film drying drum, see my video on https://m.youtube.co...h?v=5PuBina81Tk I used Filmrenew on both sides hopefully to get rid of some dust and hairs. Filmrenew supposidly adds lubercation. That may help projection.
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#7 Simon Wyss

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 03:47 AM

You are free to do what you desire. I should never use that thing. Why whirl the film around?

 

My drying drums wear an elastic cushion made from slip stop carpet underlay.


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#8 Michael Carter

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 10:37 AM

My drying drums wear an elastic cushion made from slip stop carpet underlay.

I would like to see some pictures of that. My dryer makes indents if the film isn't moved some as it shrinks. Spinning does that but I still lift a portion from end to end, redistributing it.
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#9 Simon Wyss

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 05:40 PM

Something like that

 

gallery_79259_240_26845.jpg


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#10 Michael Carter

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 05:50 PM

Nice. Thanks. That material looks like it may be a little absorbent. I would think a non absorbent material would create water marks on the back of film. I also see clear film on the ends. I have learned to load in the dark to get a black end and pictures all the way to the end.
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#11 Simon Wyss

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 03:26 AM

Tis a print on there.

 

The material is not absorbent and if, very slowly. Sympatex was its name, IIRC.


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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC