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GOOD FILM STOCK FOR INTERIOR-EXTERIOR TRANSITION (SAME TAKE)

250d vision 3 film stock interior exterior kodak fuji film 500t

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#1 Marcus Albino

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 07:13 AM

Hey guys,

 

I'm looking for a bit of advice, stock-wise. We're shooting the first ten minutes of our feature film this month and unfortunately my DP is as unfamiliar with film as I am.

 

For outdoor scenes, I'm looking into the KODAK Vision 3 250D. One shot in particular, we transition from the roof of our building to the inside of our apartment. I dug up an article on Fuji's old 250. The tester claimed it would work very well under such a transition. I'm assuming that Kodak can achieve the same result?

 

http://www.fujifilm....vivid250d/demo/

 

what would you recommend, lighting-wise, once we hit the interior. In the same one-shot, we travel quite aways around the apartment. Sometimes, windows are plentiful, sometimes not so much.

 

for everything else, I thought we could use kodak 500t. but I don't know how that would match up either.

 

does anyone know if I'm looking in the right places? if not, can you point me in the right direction.

(i also considered throwing an 85 on something like a 200t to achieve the same effect, but I'm new at this, and I don't really know what I'm talking about)

 

thank you for your help, for more information on our movie check us out at

 

po.st/sowhat


Edited by Marcus Albino, 04 March 2014 - 07:14 AM.

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#2 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 08:25 AM

Exactly what kind of transition are you talking about?

Provided it's not one continuous shot, you will be able to use one film stock (if you want) for both interiors & exteriors. I recommend settling on a Tungsten (3200K) balanced film stock. For the interiors, you will not need to filter the camera, but if you are shooting near windows, you will have to gel them to color correct the light.

You will need an 85B filter on the camera when shooting Tungsten film outdoors, otherwise you'll wind up with a blue cast due to the color temperature variance (Daylight color temp is about 5500K.)

Of course, you could also use Tungsten film for the interiors & Daylight film for the exteriors. Kodak stocks mix very well. That is an aesthetic choice, though.

Either way, make sure you shoot tests.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:06 AM

If I ever had to pick just one stock for a shoot, I'd go with 7213 200T Kodak. It's a good mid-range stock which can handle you day or night to a certain extent.


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#4 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 02:34 PM

If you can get the exposure transition with a iris pull the color shift can be dealt with effectively in the telecine or data grade to make the transition appear seamless in color balance.


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#5 Marcus Albino

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 01:06 AM

Robert,

 

you're saying with KODAK's 250d I can achieve one continuous shot (exterior to interior) and correct it in post?

 

what do you mean exactly by, "exposure transition with a iris pull"

 

 

thanks for your help


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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 01:09 AM

Iris pull is like a focus pull; but instead of focus, you open or close the iris as needed to compensate for variable exposure in a shot. For example, if your outside is a T8 and your inside is a T2.8, as you move the camera inside you'd change the iris from a T8 to a T2.8, generally somewhere like as you begin to go into a doorway. If you do it right, and time it right, it can be nearly invisible.

Personally I'd use 200T; but that's a matter of taste. I just personally prefer the 200T to the 250D (which always feels a bit like an oddball stock).


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#7 Charles Zuzak

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:42 PM

You might be able to use the 250D if you're dealing with a lot of natural sunlight falling through windows while shooting indoors.


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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:43 PM

True true, Charles, and/or if your primary lighting package is D balanced for all your ints.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: 250d, vision 3, film stock, interior, exterior, kodak, fuji, film, 500t

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