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Projecting vertical

super 8 vertical projection

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#1 Francesco Palombi

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 06:25 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I do mostly photography and for an installation I'm planning to project some super 8 videos i'm planning to shoot.

 

My question is, can I project them vertically?

 

I don't have a super 8 projector and I've never used it, so I've no idea if that can be challenging.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Francesco 


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#2 Jean-Louis Seguin

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 08:40 AM

The projector should be kept in the normal position and use a mirror mounted at 45 degrees to project upwards.

 

Jean-Louis


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#3 Francesco Palombi

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 08:58 AM

Hi Jean-Louis,

 

my bad. English is not my first language. For vertically I meant "portrait format" oriented video. 

 

Does it make sense?

 

 

Thanks,

 

Francesco


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#4 Jean-Louis Seguin

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 01:04 PM

I suppose you could do it with the projector laying down on its left side.

As long as do not block the air circulation to the ventilator grill.

 

Jean-Louis


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#5 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 02:30 PM

Does it make sense?


Hi!

I understand what you want to do. But it doesn't make any sense to me as Super8 is 1:1.33 and hence nearly square. So it wouldn't make any great difference whether you project this way or another...
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#6 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 03:19 PM

Use two (surface) mirrors, project on one and onto the other, rotate them both a part of total 90 degrees for portrait and of course make them project on the screen ahead.


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#7 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 03:21 PM

Hi!

I understand what you want to do. But it doesn't make any sense to me as Super8 is 1:1.33 and hence nearly square. So it wouldn't make any great difference whether you project this way or another...

Or mask off the sides. A sideway letterbox :)


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#8 Roberto Pirodda

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 02:01 PM

if i have understand correctly what you want to do, you must shoot with your camera rotated by 90 degrees, otherwise you will get vertical horizon-landscape


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#9 Mark Dunn

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 02:34 PM

Use two (surface) mirrors, project on one and onto the other, rotate them both a part of total 90 degrees for portrait and of course make them project on the screen ahead.

You can't rotate a projected image with flat mirrors alone, only reverse it.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 14 March 2014 - 02:35 PM.

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#10 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 06:39 PM

You can't rotate a projected image with flat mirrors alone, only reverse it.

 

True, for rotation you need to use something like a Dove prism:

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Dove_prism

 

But as Joerg mentioned, the nearly square S8 frame turned sideways is hardly portrait. A fairly simple method to get a more vertical projection aspect ratio is to shoot and then project with a 2X anamorphic lens turned 90 degrees (so that it compresses and later uncompresses vertically). This is what Tacita Dean did for her marvellous Tate installation. A 4:3 horizontal frame would become a 4:6 vertical one, some masking of the sides could make it more portrait still.

 

Or simply mask a normal frame, but you'd lose a lot of image area.

 

For an installation that may be running for a while I don't think turning a projector sideways would be a good idea.


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#11 Francesco Palombi

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 01:17 PM

Thanks everyone.

 

Coming from photography the Super 8 frame turned, for me make kind of a big difference. Just look at 4x5 photography, vertical and horizontal pics.

 

 

Mmm anyway this sounds tricky..the use of a prism i guess would bring too much attention to the viewer, unless I can kind of hide that. 

The tape I guess I just have to give it a try and see how it looks. 

 

Thanks

 

 

F


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#12 Joerg Polzfusz

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:06 AM

IMHO the main problem would be the heat:

Normally the hot gets blown out of the projector to its left side and then floats up:

Projector1.jpg

However when the projector gets rotated, the hot air gets blown out to the bottom and then returns:

Projector2.jpg

This shouldn't cause a problem when projecting a single reel. However when you do this in an "endless loop" for an installation, I fear that the projector and the film might get too hot.


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